Heat Pack for Shipping Eggs?

Discussion in 'Incubating & Hatching Eggs' started by brownfoxfarm, Jan 31, 2013.

  1. brownfoxfarm

    brownfoxfarm Out Of The Brooder

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    Apr 6, 2012
    Rural NW Illinois
    I saw an auction where the seller offered heat packs for shipping. Now, I've seen heat packs in with chicks for shipping, and they look a lot like large hothands packets. I would worry that the pack might warm up the eggs enough to start development and then lose heat in transit... wouldn't that cause some trouble?

    When you have eggs shipped in the cold months do you want a heat pack in with your eggs?

    Joyce
    http://brownfoxfarm.weebly.com
     
  2. Frost Homestead

    Frost Homestead eggmonger

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    Jul 9, 2011
    Lago Vista, TX
    I was wondering the same thing. I'd be worried it would raise the temp. enough for them to start developing
     
  3. soldonold

    soldonold Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Dec 3, 2012
    Burlington, Kansas
    I have had 3 sets of eggs shipped to me this winter without heat packs, and almost every one of them has at least started to develop. Do you think they would start if they got too cold. Quite a few of them quit pretty early, but I'm not sure that was cold related or not. I may search through some threads and see what popular opinion is. I agree, I would think that the warmth would start development and that would be even worse than cold.
     
  4. soldonold

    soldonold Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Dec 3, 2012
    Burlington, Kansas
    I looked through some threads and it looks like the consensus is not to put heat packs in. One person who did have a heat pack put in said, "I got eggs shipped to me earlier this year, and the hatch was wacky, incubation DID start early, I had some hatch at 18 days because of the heat pack." Another person said to make sure they put lots of shredded paper in for insulation. Someone else was talking about picking up some silky eggs out of a hidden nest at 20 degrees and warming them up, putting them in the incubator and has veining in all of them, so I think cold is much better than heat!
     
    Last edited: Feb 1, 2013

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