Heat

R2elk

Free Ranger
Premium member
Feb 24, 2013
11,679
36,068
1,131
Natrona County, Wyoming
Ceramic heat bulb ( no light) 25 watt can I
Use it in a homemade Styrofoam incubator
Cheers phil
If it can provide a high enough temperature inside the incubator, yes. I suspect that 25 watts will not provide the heat necessary to get up to 100°F. It will also depend on whether or not your incubator will be a still air or a forced air one. A forced air incubator is going to need a slightly bigger heat source than a still air incubator.
 

ChickenCanoe

Crossing the Road
Nov 23, 2010
29,000
18,226
867
St. Louis, MO
I wouldn't try it. Two problems are that you don't seem to have a means of regulating the temperature and ceramic heat emitters are infrared and heat what they are aimed at rather than the ambient air. If aimed at the egg, it could overheat.
Do you have a known to be accurate thermometer?
If the temperature is less or more than 99.5, you may get some to hatch but the chicks won't be in as good of condition when they hatch.
 

fil76

Songster
Oct 14, 2017
215
103
119
manchester england
Can not buy incandescent bulbs in
England any more but I have seen a
Bulb for reptiles but it is ultra violet
Is this OK
Cheers
 
Last edited:

ChickenCanoe

Crossing the Road
Nov 23, 2010
29,000
18,226
867
St. Louis, MO
What type of bulb can you use in a
Homemade incubator I was thinking
Reptile
Cheers
Ceramic and reptile are the same thing - non light producing infrared. Sometimes reptile bulbs produce light but are still infrared. Neither are appropriate for incubation. You want to have a heat emitter that isn't pointed at one location but heats all the space relatively equally.
Previous advice is correct.
The banning of incandescent lamps was a good move because it eliminated wasted electricity in lost heat in order to produce light. Since you can't find incandescent, you have to find other ways to produce heat. I prefer metallic heat emitters for incubators but if you are committed to using a lamp type implement for producing heat, you could try a halogen bulb. They still produce heat and most places haven't banned them because they aren't commonly used to light a space.
The reason I prefer metallic heat elements is because anything based on a bulb/lamp can stop working unexpectedly - ruining a hatch.
All you have to do is search 'metallic heat element' on e-bay or add the term 'incubator' to the search.
I know for a fact, there are many that use 220VAC which I believe is voltage of the power source in the UK.
 
Last edited:

ChickenCanoe

Crossing the Road
Nov 23, 2010
29,000
18,226
867
St. Louis, MO
I would also like to mention that most small Styrofoam incubators use 40 watt metallic heat elements. So, unless your incubator is very tiny, 25 watts isn't likely sufficient.
Also, you are going to need some means to control the temperature - that would be known as a thermostat.
If you were fortunate enough to size a heat element precisely with your vented container to achieve 99.5 constantly, any slight change in the ambient temperature will throw that incubator temperature out of whack. I have 3 high end cabinet incubators, one home made cabinet incy and a LG Styrofoam embryo executioner. I never cease to be amazed by how much room temperature will affect the internal temperature of even 3 side by side cabinets. The LG alone will have huge temperature swings.
 
Top