Heated perches for winter? Good idea or bad?

Newmamabear

Chirping
Mar 27, 2016
192
17
58
Alberta
Alrighty, so was pondering my fermented feed bucket and its ability to stay liquid during winter time. If I put it into a 45 gallon drum full of water and stock heater in it. Use the warmed water for thier drinking nipples and then could use some kind of filter to pump it through some tubing then it would give them heated perchs. Is this a bad idea? Would the warmth on the perch make them less suited to the cold of the ground in the winter? Or would it be okay? Would they be more susceptible to frost bite?
 

Howard E

Crowing
5 Years
Feb 18, 2016
2,881
3,984
296
Missouri
On your heated perches concept.......I think you have devised a solution that is in desperate need of a problem.
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As long as your perches are some type of wood, they are going to squat down on the roost, tuck their feet up into their feathers and ride out the very worst of it just fine.
 

EggSighted4Life

Crossing the Road
6 Years
Apr 9, 2016
14,854
20,991
892
California's Redwood Coast
Hi, welcome to BYC!
frow.gif


It's my understanding that the chickens do not need the heat and the most important thing of all is to make sure there is adequate ventilation. If the moisture builds in the coop it can cause frost bite on combs and waddles.

Although I do understand your concern for wanting to keep the birds comfortable.

Some people use deep litter in their coops to provide some winter warmth. Another tip is to feed out some scratch right before roost time. It get warmer when digesting because of the high carbs.

I live in a temperate area, so I don't have too much experience with cold. I see pics of chickens in the snow all the time though. And I saw 1 person put heating pads along the wall behind the roost. But ALL stress ventilation!

Good luck!
 

Newmamabear

Chirping
Mar 27, 2016
192
17
58
Alberta
On your heated perches concept.......I think you have devised a solution that is in desperate need of a problem. :)

As long as your perches are some type of wood, they are going to squat down on the roost, tuck their feet up into their feathers and ride out the very worst of it just fine.


How true! Thanks Howard!
 

Newmamabear

Chirping
Mar 27, 2016
192
17
58
Alberta
Hi, welcome to BYC! :frow

It's my understanding that the chickens do not need the heat and the most important thing of all is to make sure there is adequate ventilation. If the moisture builds in the coop it can cause frost bite on combs and waddles.

Although I do understand your concern for wanting to keep the birds comfortable.

Some people use deep litter in their coops to provide some winter warmth. Another tip is to feed out some scratch right before roost time. It get warmer when digesting because of the high carbs.

I live in a temperate area, so I don't have too much experience with cold. I see pics of chickens in the snow all the time though. And I saw 1 person put heating pads along the wall behind the roost. But ALL stress ventilation!

Good luck!

Awsome thanks! Too many ideas rattling around in my brain lol! I appreciate the feedback!
 

angelsun

In the Brooder
5 Years
Feb 19, 2014
47
11
49
Here's a link to instructions on constructing a heated perch. http://www.hopkinslivestock.com/building_a_heated_roost.htm

We use them here both for the peacocks and the chickens. The heat tape will turn on/off at 38F. We get down to -20F here. My experience has been that the heated perches work well and do NOT heat up the coop itself. We have not experienced any frostbite. Your mileage may vary.

Kelly
 

Newmamabear

Chirping
Mar 27, 2016
192
17
58
Alberta
Here's a link to instructions on constructing a heated perch.  http://www.hopkinslivestock.com/building_a_heated_roost.htmWe use them here both for the peacocks and the chickens.  The heat tape will turn on/off at 38F.  We get down to -20F here.  My experience has been that the heated perches work well and do NOT heat up the coop itself.  We have not experienced any frostbite.  Your mileage may vary.

Kelly


Thanks Kelly, that's a good idea, talked to the hubby too, he said my
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would probably work like a radiator where it would make the heater constantly run where it's cooling through the piping. I'll keep that in mind though. I think I've got some heat tape kicking around here. I'll
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what I can rig up. Thanks :)
 

chipawalady

Hatching
May 5, 2020
3
0
6
Hi, welcome to BYC!
frow.gif


It's my understanding that the chickens do not need the heat and the most important thing of all is to make sure there is adequate ventilation. If the moisture builds in the coop it can cause frost bite on combs and waddles.

Although I do understand your concern for wanting to keep the birds comfortable.

Some people use deep litter in their coops to provide some winter warmth. Another tip is to feed out some scratch right before roost time. It get warmer when digesting because of the high carbs.

I live in a temperate area, so I don't have too much experience with cold. I see pics of chickens in the snow all the time though. And I saw 1 person put heating pads along the wall behind the roost. But ALL stress ventilation!

Good luck!
We also use the "deep litter" in our night coop. In the winter months we gather our eggs three times a day. On the 2ed time ( around 2 or 3 p.m. ) we give our ladies cracked corn and black oil sunflower seeds. The last two nights have been very cold, with wind chills under -17 below, and the girls are doing just fine.
 

EggSighted4Life

Crossing the Road
6 Years
Apr 9, 2016
14,854
20,991
892
California's Redwood Coast
We also use the "deep litter" in our night coop. In the winter months we gather our eggs three times a day. On the 2ed time ( around 2 or 3 p.m. ) we give our ladies cracked corn and black oil sunflower seeds. The last two nights have been very cold, with wind chills under -17 below, and the girls are doing just fine.
Hi there and welcome to BYC! :frow

Please understand that since that post was made (6 years ago) I discovered feeding corn to keep warm is complete BS.. a calorie is a calorie is a calorie and chicken feed is mostly all corn already.. adding more corn may add enrichment/entertainment value BUT reduces protein and nutrient levels.

Metabolism IS what keeps the chickens warm (in addition to their down jackets that insulate against the cold).. and in low day light winter time areas without added lighting the birds MAY have a hard time consuming enough calories to maintain body weight and condition.. that is where the higher calorie BOSS can really help. The fat has more calories for the same volume inside the crop.. and best I can tell there is a pressure factor in the crop that says that's enough regular feed.

It's always recommended to keep treats to NO more than 10% of their total daily intake.

Giving the extra snack around 2-3.. just means my birds would eat less of their other feed stuffs. Doing it right at roost time means they've already had their fill but they are crazy for the snacks thus packing in a little extra.. IF actual condition is a concern.

Otherwise, if condition isn't a concern.. do enjoy giving whatever snacks in moderation knowing that it's more about enrichment!

That does sound very cold! Fowl are amazing creatures and are actually smart enough (some) to tuck their head (comb) into their feathers or under their wings.

Hope this gives a little food for thought. Warm and cozy thoughts! :)
 

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