Heated Water Bowl - Fire Started in Indianapolis, killed 6 chickens and 60k damage

Discussion in 'Coop & Run - Design, Construction, & Maintenance' started by schnebbles, Jan 8, 2014.

  1. schnebbles

    schnebbles Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I saw this last night.

    http://www.wishtv.com/news/local/6-chickens-die-in-shed-fire


    Very tragic. I'm actually using one myself. I'm going to make sure it's on cinder blocks and not sitting direct on the litter. (I only have it in the coop when it's so cold during the day and never at night). This article made me realize that I need to be more careful as well.
     
    2 people like this.
  2. NYcue

    NYcue Out Of The Brooder

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    Wow... do we know if he placed the warming plate on the litter? The article does not state that.

    Thank you for sharing this!
     
    Last edited: Jan 8, 2014
  3. blackswamp

    blackswamp Out Of The Brooder

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    I hate to sound stupid but what is a electric warming dish?
     
  4. yogifink

    yogifink Chillin' With My Peeps

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    1 person likes this.
  5. schnebbles

    schnebbles Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I don't know how it happened. I just thought it would be a good thing to remind us about different hazards. I had mine sitting on the litter without even thinking it could get warm enough to catch fire so the story was an eye opener for me.

    Electric bowls are the ones for dogs that keep the water from freezing. I had one from TSC and one from Walmart which is smaller and I like it better. I'm definitely getting a cinder block to put it on though! At least this is what I thought when I read it, but who knows for sure. I suppose there might be different kinds.

    I'll read that link yogi.

    blackswamp - where are you? I'm at Indian Lake
     
    Last edited: Jan 8, 2014
  6. yogifink

    yogifink Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Not to much proof to this but... from this link, hay will ignite between 180-212 degrees. http://ext.wsu.edu/hay-combustion.html Likewise with woods shavings: http://www.awf.com/downloads/MSDS shavings.pdf. Solid wood does not combust until over 500 I think.



    A 40w light blub will reach 195 degrees at the filament.... However, That heat would be very quickly reduced as it reaches the glass bulb and would probably not exceed 180 degrees (to the touch). I could not find a temperature for the surface of a lightbulb online.

    A tin sheet or a piece of wood within a few inches of the bulb would act as enough of a barrier to prevent a fire from heat created from the bulb - considering there was some air exchange. Therefore, if there was a barrier between the bulb and the bedding, I would say that faulty wiring would be the cause of a fire.
     
  7. schnebbles

    schnebbles Chillin' With My Peeps

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    My bowl doesn't have any kind of bulb, I'll have to check just how the underside is. I think it's all plastic so the heating part is totally covered up. I thought it would be safe. I had read an awful story when first came here about someones barn catching fire and it might have even been the story you posted. Those poor people, they sound attached to their animals like I get.

    My flock has mareks and it is awful when I lose one. I started with 8 chickens and now have 4.
     
  8. yogifink

    yogifink Chillin' With My Peeps

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    If you have a plastic bowl heater, I think you would be fine. IMO the plastic would melt way before a fire ever happened. But to be on the safe side, I would make a little stand out of brick or block for it - just to keep it away from bedding.

    I still think that the wiring is of larger concern though. Most folks opt to get cheap extension cords that are not rated for outdoor use and then proceed to plug them into unsecure outlets. Really just a fire waiting to happen.
     
  9. schnebbles

    schnebbles Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I do need to get one more outdoor cord. I have 2 - one plugs in my house and goes out under the door, then one plugs into that one (it's a 3 way) to the heat light and I do have a regular orange one attached the the bowl, but that connection is not in the coop. I really need an outdoor one, I'll put that on my list right now! I guess I figured it would be safer to keep the connection outside the coop.
     
  10. yogifink

    yogifink Chillin' With My Peeps

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    If possible, it would be best to use one length of cord from start to finish. And, if you can, protect the plug at the bowl from weather and bedding.
     

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