heating coop and water

Discussion in 'Coop & Run - Design, Construction, & Maintenance' started by archerobx, Nov 3, 2009.

  1. archerobx

    archerobx Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Feb 4, 2009
    Pa
    Let me know if this will work.

    I am going to use a thermo-cube on/20 off/30.
    Put one of those in the middle mounted to the roof.
    Was going to bring water in the coop and put it under the light.

    I know 30 is below freezing temp for water but was thinking with the light shinning on the water it would melt and not freeze.


    I was loking at porclein light and they seem real expensive. Would a heat lamp or IR light put too much lite out and bother the birds at nite.


    thank you, this is my first winter.
     
  2. TipsyDog

    TipsyDog Chillin' With My Peeps

    May 14, 2009
    Aregua, Paraguay
    Do thermo cubes go down to 20? I thought they ran at a higher temperature. Best thing you can do is insulate your coop well from drafts (but still have adequate ventilation).

    I don't need much heat because my coop is only 5 x 6 and better insulated than my house. I will be using a red 250 watt heat lamp which is plugged into an in-line thermometer. Mine can be set from -10* to 100*. I trust them more than the cubes. I also have a wireless thermometer mounted in coop so I can monitor the temperature from my kitchen window. You can pick them up for $10.

    Also, don't forget about your run. Just today we made plywood panels that will mount around the run to block wind and blowing snow on the north and west sides.
     
  3. AkTomboy

    AkTomboy Chillin' With My Peeps

    Apr 21, 2009
    DJ, Alaska
    I love the thermo cube for the winter. But I no longer use it in my coop as I have everything hard wired now. But I still use it for the heat tapes on my pipes, well house and so on. I think your water will still freeze so you may need to look into one of the cookie tin heaters or so on.
     
  4. archerobx

    archerobx Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Feb 4, 2009
    Pa
    thanks
    is your inline a dura stat thermostat?

    thanks again
     
  5. patandchickens

    patandchickens Flock Mistress

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    Apr 20, 2007
    Ontario, Canada
    You can keep water liquid with a high-wattage light above it, up to a point, but it is a very inefficient way of doing it (wastes a lot of electricity), on account of heat *rises* and also lamps tend to radiate heat/light in a lot more directions than just onto the waterer.

    Much better to buy or build a heated waterer base (or buy a heated waterer; or a heated dogbowl, if you have relatively few chickens), such that the great majority of the heat output goes into the water. The storebought ones often have a thermostat built in. There are several DIY designs discussed on many threads on this forum if you search for 'cookie tin water heater' or 'cinderblock water heater'.

    Or, depending on what part of PA you are in (where are you?) you may not even really NEED a heater as long as you have a largeish insulated container (NOT a double-walled galvanized font, they bust if they freeze) and just bring fresh water once a day.

    Good luck, have fun,

    Pat
     
  6. archerobx

    archerobx Chillin' With My Peeps

    510
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    Feb 4, 2009
    Pa
    I am near Pittsburgh.

    going to make a run to check out the pet stores and tractor supply to see what they have as far as water containesrs

    thanks
     
  7. TipsyDog

    TipsyDog Chillin' With My Peeps

    May 14, 2009
    Aregua, Paraguay
  8. LynneP

    LynneP Chillin' With My Peeps

    I agree- you'd be better off with a good heated waterer and insulation. Paying the hydro company seems so...um...wrong.

    I do have a layer light on 5 am - 8 am from october to May, but it never puts my bill over the baseline amount allowed on that meter.
     

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