Heating Effects of Corn on Poultry

Discussion in 'Feeding & Watering Your Flock' started by Mac in Wisco, Jul 24, 2008.

  1. Mac in Wisco

    Mac in Wisco Antagonist

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    Quote:sorry if i'm misunderstanding you here, mac, but yes, that was what i was talking about in my original and subsequent posts, so i'm not sure where your we is coming from. :p

    Since animals reduce feed intake as it gets hotter, it's better to feed them a high calorie ration so they can maintain on the little that they are eating. I didn't have a specific source in mind when comparing corn to oats, but just did a Google search and found a document that backs up what I said.

    http://www.utextension.utk.edu/newsevents/newsletters/HEsummer02.pdf

    Although it doesn't go into the nitty gritty details of why, it says to reduce oats and feed more corn in the summer for horses. Less fiber, less protein equals less heating. It says feeding fats would be even better, lots of energy without the heating increment of proteins...

    hee, well, i can post links to three more documents via google that back up my assertion and another three that back up yours! at any rate, it looks like there's some squeamishness about continuing this conversation in this particular thread, so i'll bow out with the caveat that, to my mind, this particular tale hasn't been proved to be an old wives one. [​IMG]

    Hi, the "we" I was referring to was the other people in the conversation, there was at least another. [​IMG]

    Anyway... What links were you referring to? Post them so I can take a gander...
     
  2. Mac in Wisco

    Mac in Wisco Antagonist

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    To those just joining this topic, it is my contention that feeding corn in the summer heat is not unhealthy nor dangerous in regards to poultry. I feel it can even be beneficial in hot weather. Feel free to carry on a civil argument. Feel free to call me wrong and don't hold it against me if I do the same towards you...
     
  3. dacjohns

    dacjohns People Cracker Upper

    [​IMG]
     
  4. Mac in Wisco

    Mac in Wisco Antagonist

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    I'm getting there... More to follow. My job keeps interfering with my chat time... [​IMG]
     
  5. Lazy J Farms Feed & Hay

    Lazy J Farms Feed & Hay Chillin' With My Peeps

    THIS IS AN OLD WIVE'S TALE!!!!!!!! i HAVE BEEN TRYING TO EDUCATE THE MEMBERS OF THIS BOARD ABOUT THE USE OF CORN AND THE FACT THAT IS DOES NOT INCREASE BODY TEMPERATURE.

    As I have stated many times in the past months, corn is an easily digested high energy feed ingredient. It does not produce excess heat like fibrous ingredients like whole wheat, whole oats, alfalfa meal, etc.

    Jim
     
  6. ravenfeathers

    ravenfeathers Chillin' With My Peeps

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    hey, mac, thanks for starting this thread. i'm on my way out the door, but i've got a few links to shake out, dust off, or otherwise put up for discussion. i'll also edit in my earlier posts from the other thread.

    and, i think i should add yet another disclaimer to my long list of disclaimers: i feed some corn to my chicken in hot weather. [​IMG]
     
  7. Mac in Wisco

    Mac in Wisco Antagonist

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    Ok, the question at hand is whether feeding corn to poultry during hot weather is detrimental. The traditional wisdom is that it makes the bird hot which can lead to greater heat stress and even death in hot weather.

    When nutritionists talk of corn being a "hot" feedstock they are referring to the caloric content. Corn is much higher in calories per pound than most cereal grains. People then mistakenly assume that a "hot" feed must make an animal hotter. In defending this they say the excess calories must produce more heat making the animal hotter or they think that that "hot" refers to the animal's temperment, that feeding excess calories makes
    them more energetic thus burning excess energy that increases the animal's temperature.

    Getting down to the basics of nutrition, a complete ration consists of proteins (amino acids), carbohydrates, lipids (fats), vitamins and minerals. Energy available in a ration is stated in calories. If you were to burn a portion of a ration in a flame to extract all energy you would be measuring the Gross Energy available in kilocalories per kilogram.

    All of this energy is not availale to the animal. A certain portion of energy is passed on through fecal matter. The remaining is termed Digestible Energy. A portion of this energy is passed on through the urine and creation of gases. What is left is Metabolizable Energy, but once again all of this energy is still not available to the bird. A portion of this energy is expended as heat in digestion and metabolic processes. This portion is referred to as the Heat Increment. What is left is Net Energy used in maintenance and production. Maintenance being the energy used in daily activities and production being energy used in growth, replacement, and reproductive products.

    The Heat Increment is what we are concerned with. The heat produced in digestion is related to the fiber content of the feedstock. The higher the fiber, the more heat. Heat produced in metabolism differs among the nutrients in a feed ration. For protein the heat increment is 20-30%, for carbs, 10-15% and for fats, 5-10%. (Best numbers I could come up with, they vary among different texts).

    Based on this, some nutritionists recommended formulating feed rations by Heat Increment to reduce heat stress in livestock. Since animals cut back on feed intake during hot weather, they recommend increasing total energy in the ration to help the animal maintain on the reduced intake. They also recommend lowering protein levels and feeding more carbs, or even better, fats, which have the lowest Heat Increment. Additionally they recommend low fiber rations to reduce the heat increment from digestion.

    So where does that leave corn? Well corn is high energy, easily digestible, and low in protein, everything that the nutritionists recommend to reduce heat stress.

    Conversely, in cold weather, birds will eat to meet their energy requirements. If a coop is maintained at moderate temperatures feed intake stays fairly normal. If the temperature plunges the birds eat more to maintain their temperature. If they are eating an excess of standard rations they are getting too much protein in which the excess is excreted in the urine, leading to poor feed conversion. Once again, corn to the rescue! Supplemental corn can help them meet their energy requirements and cut their protein intake back to required levels.
     
    Stephine likes this.
  8. Lazy J Farms Feed & Hay

    Lazy J Farms Feed & Hay Chillin' With My Peeps

    Quote:Mac:

    I have a PhD in Livestock Nutrition and could not have summarized the use of corn in monogastric rations better. Thanks for a very good explanation.

    Jim Ph.D. KSU 1998
     
    Stephine likes this.
  9. antlers

    antlers Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Lazy J Farms Feed & Hay :

    Quote:Mac:

    I have a PhD in Livestock Nutrition and could not have summarized the use of corn in monogastric rations better. Thanks for a very good explanation.

    Jim Ph.D. KSU 1998

    And I taught High school and Adult production Ag for 10 years and have farmed all my life. I agree Jim . Thanks Mac!​
     
  10. Mac in Wisco

    Mac in Wisco Antagonist

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    Lazy J Farms Feed & Hay :

    THIS IS AN OLD WIVE'S TALE!!!!!!!!

    Yes, I originally brought this up in a thread about Old Wive's Tales, but was asked to stop talking about it. Because some members disagreed with me, others grew uncomfortable with the otherwise pleasant disaccord...
     

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