Hello and chicken vocabulary help!!!

Discussion in 'New Member Introductions' started by Heidizzybean, Apr 3, 2016.

  1. Heidizzybean

    Heidizzybean Out Of The Brooder

    36
    0
    29
    Aug 6, 2013
    Point of a Thematic Unit: To bridge the gap for English Language Learners in the Academic Classroom.

    Age: 4 to 5 years old.

    Theme Goals: TLW………
    The learner will is able to name the main parts of a chicken.
    The student will be able to match the different pictures of a developing baby chick to the correct date of its development, be able to make observations, and conclusions to our hatching experiment.
    The student will correctly name the parts of an egg.
    The learner will be able to identify a fresh egg from an older egg by doing the “float test.”

    Vocabulary:
    Egg Yolk – the golden yellowish sphere that is in the egg.
    Egg White – the gooey clear liquid that surrounds the egg yolk.
    Chalaza – the two white strings that you see on either end of the egg yolk, which holds the egg yolk in place inside the eggshell.
    Eggshell – the hard, multi-layered calcium rich shell that protects the egg from harm.
    Egg bloom – the protective layer of coating that keeps bacteria and other harmful microscopic items out of the inside of the egg, which in turn helps to protect the developing embryo.
    Incubation – the twenty-one day or three week period of time a developing baby chick needs to grow before hatching, either under a broody hen, or in an incubator.
    Broody hen – a female chicken that has stopped laying eggs after she has either laid or stolen a large amount of eggs to sit on in a private nesting box, or hidden away so she can hatch her baby chicks in peace.
    Incubator – a cleverly invented machine that is often used to hatch eggs, which can be set to a certain temperature, and humidity level for the chicks to develop properly.
    “Candling” – where in a dark corner or at night, you take an incubated egg out from under the broody hen, or the incubator, and shine a bright light from the wide part to see if there is a baby chick developing inside.
    Comb – the tall, usually red fleshy part that stands on top of a chicken’s head.
    Beak – the hard and sharp part outside of a chicken’s mouth that is made of a thin, hornlike material which functions to help them pick up food to eat.
    Wattles – the two and usually red fleshy parts that hang down from under the chicken’s beak.
    Wings – the strong and feathered “arms” of a chicken, though they cannot fly like other birds, can help them get to rather tall heights, and fly for a short distance.
    *Note: though there are many other parts to a chicken, to be developmentally appropriate, and I am only mentioning the most common parts. 

    Hey, I'm Heidizzybean, been a member for a few years, but been way to busy to get online lately.

    I am a Junior in college at Tennessee Technological University and need some help with some chicken vocabulary. I just need some help to make these terms a little more developmentally appropriate is all. :)
     
  2. drumstick diva

    drumstick diva Still crazy after all these years. Premium Member

    82,502
    10,267
    816
    Aug 26, 2009
    Out to pasture
    Your vocabulary has been a help to me and I've been on here for years. [​IMG] Good job
     
    1 person likes this.
  3. Pork Pie Ken

    Pork Pie Ken Monkey Business Premium Member

    28,707
    14,888
    616
    Jan 30, 2015
    Africa - near the equator
    [​IMG]

    CT
     
  4. Heidizzybean

    Heidizzybean Out Of The Brooder

    36
    0
    29
    Aug 6, 2013
    [​IMG]I was actually asking for help to "dumb" these terms down to where 4 and 5 year olds would understand the terms, but it's fine.

    Been raising chickens for over 10 years, loved every moment with them, and hope to continue to raise them in the future.
    Right now, I've been getting up to 12 eggs a day, which is awesome, but as I am a little low on egg customers, need some people to buy lots of eggs from me, otherwise I may put my RIR and BR eggs into egg cartons, and sell them at the chicken sale as hatching eggs. Got a big RIR rooster who is super busy all the girls; so all the eggs are fertile.
     
  5. N F C

    N F C doo be doo be doo Premium Member

    34,367
    10,425
    656
    Dec 12, 2013
    Wyoming
    [​IMG]
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by