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Help! Beak black with frostbite - what can I do?

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by Pastiche, Mar 18, 2016.

  1. Pastiche

    Pastiche Out Of The Brooder

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    Mar 7, 2016
    My lovely Sicilia Buttercup has black around her nostrils and the base of her beak! Half the beak is affected, and I'm worried sick. I only have three chickens, and I've brought them inside tonight, and put neosporin on their beaks? Am I an idiot for doing this? I can't find anything at all about frostbitten beaks - just wattles, combs and toes. But I"m terrified she will lose her beak. I understand the blackened areas signify necrotic tissue. How will she survive without a beak?

    I realize I sound hysterical at this point - but I would appreciate any advice or experience anyone can give me. Thank you!
     
  2. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

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    Apr 3, 2011
    southern Ohio
    Welcome to BYC. Please try to post a picture or two of the chicken. Are you certain she didn't get something on her beak, or damaged it?
     
  3. Pastiche

    Pastiche Out Of The Brooder

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    Mar 7, 2016
    No, I think I'm just a novice. My husband pulled up an earlier photo of these hens, and lo and behold, they have black on portions of their beaks! That's just how they look. I must have been more worried about the 16 degree temp that I realized.

    How did my children survive me as a mom?

    Thank you so much for responding. Is it even possible to get frostbite on a beak?
     
  4. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

    28,083
    2,104
    471
    Apr 3, 2011
    southern Ohio
    Oh, don't worry about it--I'm sure your kids are fine. I've not seen frostbite of the beak, but feet, legs, combs, and wattles seem to get it especially during January and February every year.
     

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