Help-beak problems-PICS

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by jaimie44, May 23, 2010.

  1. jaimie44

    jaimie44 Out Of The Brooder

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    Mar 9, 2010
    It was suggested I try posting this here and most had never seen it before. I have two wyandottes, 3 1/2 weeks, that have a tiny lower beak and fast-growing upper beak. One of them is doing good the other seems a little weak. They both will eat from a big open bowl full of food but Im worried about the smaller, weaker one. This deformity was not noticed until this past week so from the beginning they looked normal. I have 4 other wyandottes, all came from Cackle. Can anyone suggest what I should do? Im afraid that eating is difficult for the smaller one and as time goes on may get worse. I dont want them to starve! They both drink water. Thanks!

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  2. cambriagardener

    cambriagardener Chillin' With My Peeps

    I can't believe that no one has responded to this post Jaimie. I'll give it a "bump" and see what happens. [​IMG]
     
  3. jaimie44

    jaimie44 Out Of The Brooder

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    Mar 9, 2010
    Thank you. I appreciate it. Is it really than uncommon that NO ONE has ever dealt with it before????
     
  4. cambriagardener

    cambriagardener Chillin' With My Peeps

    Don't get discouraged, Jaimie. You have good pictures so I'm sure someone will come along in the next day or two to help. While you are waiting, check past posts on the subject by going to the top of this page and "search" the subject. I typed in "beak problem short bottom beak" and there were quite a few previous posts on the subject. I think there are alot of beak problems with chicks, not at all uncommon. Some of them grow into healthy hens. You wouldn't want to breed the hens, simply because it will continue the deformity. I'd certainly let Cackle know what they sent to you but that won't help your present situation unless they can suggest a solution (which I doubt). We're going out today. I'll check in this evening to see if anyone has helped you. Good luck! [​IMG]
     
  5. jjparke

    jjparke Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 20, 2008
    Boise
    it's simple- if they can eat and drink ON THEIR OWN and in no pain then leave 'em be. otherwise cull
     
  6. jaimie44

    jaimie44 Out Of The Brooder

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    Quote:While culling may be simple for some folks...its heart-breaking for others. Im one of those "others". I prefer to have the peace of mind that I did absolutely everything I possibly could to save one of Gods creatures...but thats just me.

    I am worried about the smaller of the two because as I said in my first post he/she is weak.
     
  7. al6517

    al6517 Real Men can Cook

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    May 13, 2008
    Quote:While culling may be simple for some folks...its heart-breaking for others. Im one of those "others". I prefer to have the peace of mind that I did absolutely everything I possibly could to save one of Gods creatures...but thats just me.

    I am worried about the smaller of the two because as I said in my first post he/she is weak.

    She is weak and smaller from lack of proper nutrition, if you are truely worried about the well being of this chick as you so ademently profess, then culling is the only responsible thing to do. It seems irresponsible to let it suffer and that is apparently what your doing to it. Sorry but it is sometimes how things go, now from what you said it appears Cakle has some issues with keeping sub-standard breeding stock if you have 2 of the same breed with the same problem.

    AL
     
  8. Chicken Boo

    Chicken Boo Chillin' With My Peeps

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    While you are waiting for a reply on directly dealing with the beak, have you tried hand feeding the little girl?

    My GLW also had a larger beak that the rest of the chicks. She was not having trouble eating or drinking and it really made her look like an eagle. Then, one day it was gone.

    Good luck. Somebody knows something.
     
  9. jaimie44

    jaimie44 Out Of The Brooder

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    Mar 9, 2010
    Quote:Thank You. I have seperated the two with the beak problems so I can watch their eating habits more closely. With 28 chicks it was hard to gauge whether or not they were making it to the food bowl often! I have given them a deeper bowl and filled it with food mounding it over in the middle to make it easier for them to "scoop" the food. The bigger one started eating heartily, the younger was just preening while standing in the middle of the food bowl. I will hand feed if it comes to that. No way these two are ready to take a dirt nap yet!
     
  10. BarkerChickens

    BarkerChickens Microbrewing Chickenologist

    Nov 25, 2007
    High Desert, CA
    Jaimie, can you take an emery board (or sandpaper, dremal (carefully), etc) and file down the beak a bit? While I can't hep with the small beak issue, the upper beak will have an issue becoming over grown. That curve from the over growth will probably make eating more difficult. It may be time consuming, but if it give the chick a chance at a normal life, then it may be worth it. [​IMG] I'm with you....I will only cull if absolutely necessary (we had a chick with a severe cross-beak and the option was cull or let him starve to death). A blunt beak will not affect the birds ability to eat, etc (just be careful of the quick...it is like a fingernail). Not sure if the small beak is brittle (maybe harder than normal), so just be cautious of it. [​IMG]

    Not much help and definitely not a cure...but thought I'd throw out my opinion on how to maybe help the situation. [​IMG]
     

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