HELP!!! CHICK EMERGENCY.

coach723

Free Ranging
6 Years
Feb 12, 2015
6,525
10,921
611
North Florida
You have to post the video to youtube or other host and put the link here, then it will show up.
I'm going to guess that it's wry neck. Treatment is Vitamin E (400 iu daily) with some selenium to help absorbtion of the E. Selenium can be gotten from some cooked egg, sunflower seeds, or canned tuna.
I would give some B complex (regular, not time release) also since you will be supplementing.
1/4 to 1/2 tablet daily, ground up and mixed in some feed.
More info on wry neck:
https://www.raising-happy-chickens.com/wry-neck.html
 
May 17, 2020
110
86
63
NW Washington
You have to post the video to youtube or other host and put the link here, then it will show up.
I'm going to guess that it's wry neck. Treatment is Vitamin E (400 iu daily) with some selenium to help absorbtion of the E. Selenium can be gotten from some cooked egg, sunflower seeds, or canned tuna.
I would give some B complex (regular, not time release) also since you will be supplementing.
1/4 to 1/2 tablet daily, ground up and mixed in some feed.
More info on wry neck:
https://www.raising-happy-chickens.com/wry-neck.html
Agreed. There aren't many other chicken diseases that cause them to twist their neck like that. A video would certainly be helpful though.
 

Isaac 0

Enabler
Jul 19, 2016
23,998
97,884
1,321
Iowa
Agreed. There aren't many other chicken diseases that cause them to twist their neck like that. A video would certainly be helpful though.

Nutritional deficiencies in thiamine(B1), and E, neurological damage, Viral or bacterial infections, Neoplasms, and toxin ingestion can all cause some sort of twisting/paralysis of the neck with birds.

I'd probably first start off by eliminating a nutritional deficiency as that's the most common with chicks around this age.
 

coach723

Free Ranging
6 Years
Feb 12, 2015
6,525
10,921
611
North Florida
Vitamin supplements as indicated above. If it's a deficiency then reversing it can get them back to normal. Long term, check mill dates on feed bags and get the freshest possible (many are printed on the sewn strip on the bottom of the bag, or on the tag). As feed ages the vitamins deteriorate. Keep treats (everything except feed ) to 10% or less of total diet. Some birds are just more prone to this. I've had issues with hens during molt because they don't always eat well then and usually after one or two doses of vitamins they are OK again. If this is a lower ranking bird it may be getting kept from feed, so adding a feeder or two can help it get more access.
 

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