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Help! Corid dosage confusion

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by dustbath, Jan 23, 2009.

  1. dustbath

    dustbath Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I'm very confused about the dosage for Corid (9.6% amprolium). I have several sick birds and need to know how much to give them urgently.

    My vet said 2 cc/gallon of water. I treated them with this dosage a couple of times and I'm not convinced it was enough (they're either still sick or sick again a few months later).

    I've seen references on this site to about 10 cc/gal but one post said that's the dosage for cattle and for chickens it's 4 cc/gal.

    Please help! Thanks!
     
  2. dustbath

    dustbath Chillin' With My Peeps

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    PS: I just spoke to the vet again who insists 2 cc/gal is the medical standard. If so, would a higher dosage hurt them? I don't let them have access to other sources of water but they aren't drinking much (it's very cold).
     
  3. dustbath

    dustbath Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Is it possible that the lower dose is the 21-day preventative course, not the 5-day treatment?

    Thanks!
     
  4. pips&peeps

    pips&peeps There is no "I" in Ameraucana

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    On my bottle from Peter Brown, I remember it says 9.5ml/cc per gallon.
     
  5. dustbath

    dustbath Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I've seen that dosage referred to also and it's much higher than either of the other instructions I've seen. Why?????

    I don't want to either under-dose or over-dose my hens! Does anyone have any light to shed??

    Thanks!!
     
  6. silkiechicken

    silkiechicken Staff PhD Premium Member

    What are you treating for? If they have something that is not affected by corid, doesn't matter how much you give them. If you are treating confirmed cocci, and they keep getting it, they are picking it up from the soil which has too much in it and that needs to change first.
     
  7. dustbath

    dustbath Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Yes, they have cocci. They had it in August too, which is why I thought the dosage (2 cc/gal) might in fact be too low,

    The soil? How do you change the sol? They free-range so there'd be an awful lot to dig up and replace. There haven't been chickens here for a long time before the last couple of years. Does that make a difference?
     
  8. sammi

    sammi Chillin' With My Peeps

    Dec 21, 2007
    Southeast USA
    here is a link to an article about cocci and treatment at First State Vet Supply, by Peter Brown..

    http://www.firststatevetsupply.com/poultry-health/coccidiosis.html

    also..if you click Contact Us..in the banner..it will bring up a page for email to Peter Brown.
    phone number for First State Vet is 1 (410) 546-6137

    they do sell Amprol Liquid..but I don't know what the percentage is.
    you could ask someone there.

    people also have good results using liquid Sulmet..available at most farm/feed stores, and not expensive.
    directions for use are on the label.
    it's better to not use the same med all the time...as stated in the article.
     
  9. Mrs MIA

    Mrs MIA Chick Magnet

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    Last edited: Jan 23, 2009
  10. silkiechicken

    silkiechicken Staff PhD Premium Member

    Quote:If they had it then and now, it is two separate infections so to say. All the drugs do is stop the protozoa from dividing in the chicken.

    Chickens will have a healthy parasite load, so if they keep getting it, likely there is a secondary thing going on.

    Try to make sure that there are not too many muddy spots, and that water/feeders stay clean. For example, try to make sure the water doesn't spill as under water dishes can be moist and prolong the life of cocci in the ground. Also avoid throwing table scraps or other treats on the ground, and convince them to eat such things from dishes.

    Also, try keeping the coop dry and make sure the birds are getting a healthy diet. Not too many treats, so they can build up a healthy body. A healthy bird should be able to look at cocci and laugh. Warm moist soils is cocci's best friend.

    Another possibility is that the strain of cocci they have now is not the same strain as they had before. If it is a different strain, as per brought in by a wild bird flying by, they need to build up a new immunity to this particular type. However, winter may have been harsh on the birds, so their immune systems could be stressed and thus cocci takes hold.

    If the birds are not showing symptoms, just supplement with a vitamin to get their immune systems running and they should be able to become immune to cocci. And some years, some areas just are bad for the cocci. Good luck!
     

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