Help, Duck hurt leg??

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by Sue S, May 24, 2019.

  1. Sue S

    Sue S Songster

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    I'm not sure what happened to my 1 female, she was fine this morning when I let them out of the pen to free range, & then I notice at about 2:30 this afternoon that she was sitting in the yard away from the other ducks, my male keep going up to her " like he was checking on her" , when I was done giving my dog a bath, I went out to check on her & she was sitting down at the pond with the rest of the ducks but when they walked away she could barely walk. I picked her up & brought her to the garage, I checked & there is no bleeding & I didn't see anything in the bottom of her foot but she can't put any weight on it, I have her in a tote in the garage & she just stands on 1 foot???? Please duck hurt leg.jpg help.
     
  2. Happy Quack

    Happy Quack Songster

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    Swimming water is a great idea. It will keep the weight off her leg. Also try to keep her from walking to much.
     
  3. TSA

    TSA Chirping

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    She could of sprained it and thats why she won't walk on it. My female duck has done it a few times and I just make sure she has an area so she can swim when she wants to and I kept her by herself for a week or two and she was better.
     
  4. Sue S

    Sue S Songster

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    I was told she has bumblefoot in both feet. right foot.jpg left foot.jpg
     
  5. TSA

    TSA Chirping

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    May 24, 2019
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    Yes that's what it looks like.
    I found some info that might help.

    Bumblefoot is an infection in the pad of your bird's foot. A very minor cut or abrasion in the pad or toes can lead to this condition. The best way to prevent it is to not have any sharp rocks, sticks, nails, lumber or metal in your duck's pen. If you do, they will find it.

    Unless the duck is able to fight off the infection, it often leads to a large, swollen, bulbous growth on the bottom of their foot. It is obviously painful and cumbersome for the bird. If you catch it early, you can often provide antibiotics and heal it. However, blood flow to the feet of a duck is not great and getting adequate amounts of antibiotic to the infected spot is difficult.

    Different types of antibiotic have been used to cure the problem: one pill (22.7mg) per day of Baytril, 50-100 mg of clindamycin, doxycycline, lincomycen or doxycycline per day, or 250 mg of amoxicillin per day. Of course it is best to consult with a veterinarian first.

    If antibiotics alone to do not cure the problem, you or your vet will need to lance and remove all the infected pus in the center of the growth. Wash and disinfect the foot with a diluted iodine solution. Make an incision with a sharp scalpel and press out all the pus. Then you must flush out all the remaining pus with your diluted iodine solution. Put a pad over the incision, and then try to keep pressure off the incision with a "cast" or a cut up tennis ball over the foot. Keep the bird out of swimming water until it is healed. Continue the antibiotics until the wound is completely healed.

    Any time you are administering antibiotics, it is good to also administer probiotics during and after the antibiotic use. Probiotics are good bacteria that are required for proper digestion and health. As the antibiotics may kill these, it is good to replace them. Check at your local feed store or use yogurt, which is full of probiotics.
    Hope this helps.
     
    Last edited: May 25, 2019
    Happy Quack likes this.

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