Help! Duck with eye shut and funny breathing :(

Discussion in 'Ducks' started by Shadowhills Farm, Nov 30, 2009.

  1. Shadowhills Farm

    Shadowhills Farm Chillin' With My Peeps

    903
    4
    131
    Nov 14, 2009
    Crystal River, Fl
    So this morning I went outside to help feed and water the chickens/ducks, and I noticed only ONE eye on my duck Motley. I was thinking she lost her eye, but there was no signs of blood on her or in the coop. I brought her in and tried to clear her nose by a warm washcloth and see if her eye was actually gone or if something else was wrong using the warm washcloth. Then I heard her breathing funny, like she was working to breathe. I brought Motley inside and put her in a dog crate with some food and water. She was shaking her head A LOT. I left the room to get the camera and came back and her eye was open a little (see pic). I figured to let her go swimming to see if that would help her at all. Filled up the sink with warm water (because it's cold inside the house), and she swam for about 8 minutes.

    After her bath she seemed okay breathing wise but her eye is still goopy (it is open though).


    I fed and watered them last night about 4:45pm and everyone was OK, including Motley.


    What can this be and is there anything I can do for it? I really don't have the money to take her to the vet (and I don't know if any of these vets around here do ducks anyways).....

    Thanks in advance for your help! I will keep an eye on her and keep her inside for today, but I have to go to class soon for a while [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
    ^ Sorry I know it's not the greatest pic, but I didn't want the flash to go off right in her eye.
     
  2. classroomducks

    classroomducks Chillin' With My Peeps

    350
    1
    119
    Sep 19, 2009
    Fort Worth, Tx
    Can ducks get respiratory infections? Maybe a sinus infection that is draining to her eyes...i know people have that happen when their sinuses get so full it has to go somewhere....

    Im not an expert, but I would bet she has some sort of infection from what you describe... id wait for someone else to weigh in though. Sorry I cant be more help.
     
  3. Buff Hooligans

    Buff Hooligans Scrambled

    12,147
    107
    311
    Jun 11, 2007
    Bumping this so more duck people see it. Maybe the midwesterners are awake by now.
     
  4. rainplace

    rainplace Interstellar Duck Academy

  5. Shadowhills Farm

    Shadowhills Farm Chillin' With My Peeps

    903
    4
    131
    Nov 14, 2009
    Crystal River, Fl
    Hey guys thanks for your bumping and inputs!

    Classroomducks- That's what I was thinking that it's some type of infection [​IMG] But it's weird how no one else has any signs.

    Rainplace- Her breathing is not too good- Had my fiancee check on her before he left to go to his classes. He said shes still breathing weirdly. I just checked on her and her breathing has not gotten better. Yes, our Pekin Drake has been on her a couple of times. I read the article, that could be it, but her feathers aren't sticky like they were describing?



    I hope there is something I can do. I really couldn't see her eye, but I believe that it's better than the pic I took this morning.


    Thanks again for your help. We appreciate it.

    ETA: Found some info online.....

    Riemerella anatipestifer Infection
    This bacterial disease of ducks is also known as Pasteurella anatipestifer infection, infectious serositis and New Duck disease. Anatipestifer infection causes high mortality, weight loss and condemnation. In the acute form, listlessness, eye discharge and diarrhea are commonly seen. Ducks show incoordination, shaking of the head and twisted neck. Birds are commonly found on their backs, paddling their legs. Typical lesions found in dead birds are infected air sacs, membranes covering the heart and liver, and meningitis. Preventive management and vaccination are effective means of control. Penicillin, enrofloxacin and sulfadimethoxine-ormetoprim (0.04-0.08% in feed) are effective in reducing mortality.

    Does it sound like she has it from what I described? Do I need to take her to the vet??
     
    Last edited: Nov 30, 2009
  6. rainplace

    rainplace Interstellar Duck Academy

    Check out the articles here:

    http://www.shagbarkbantams.com/contents.htm

    The fungal article almost seemed a good fit, but it lacked the eye problems.

    Riemerella anatipestifer Infection is infectious and you said none of your other ducks are showing signs being sick?
     
  7. rainplace

    rainplace Interstellar Duck Academy

    Found here:
    http://merckvetmanual.com/mvm/index.jsp?cfile=htm/bc/204000.htm


    Infection with Riemerella (Pasteurella) anatipestifer is a contagious, widely distributed disease that primarily affects young ducks and turkeys. Other waterfowl, chickens, and pheasants also may be affected. The epidemiology and pathogenesis are not understood. Ducks are believed to be infected by the respiratory route or when R anatipestifer is introduced into toenail scratches of the webbed foot. Turkeys may be infected by injuries or by the respiratory route when another pathogen disrupts the respiratory epithelium.

    Affected ducks, usually 2-7 wk old, often have ocular and nasal discharges, mild coughing and sneezing, tremors of the head and neck, and incoordination. Stunting may occur. Fibrinous exudate in the pericardial cavity and over the surface of the liver is the most characteristic lesion. Fibrinous airsacculitis is common, and infection of the CNS can result in fibrinous meningitis. The spleen and liver may be swollen. Pneumonia may be seen. Mortality is usually 2-30%.

    Affected turkeys, usually 5-15 wk old, often exhibit dyspnea, droopiness, hunched back, lameness, and a twisted neck. Fibrinous pericarditis and epicarditis are the most pronounced lesions. There may also be fibrinous perihepatitis, airsacculitis, and purulent synovitis. Osteomyelitis, meningitis, and focal pneumonia are seen occasionally. Mortality is 5-60%, and condemnations are 3-13%.

    Diagnosis is based on signs, lesions, and isolation and identification of the causative organism, because other diseases, particularly colibacillosis ( Colisepticemia: Introduction) and chlamydiosis ( Avian Chlamydiosis: Introduction), may produce similar lesions. Chocolate agar medium is recommended for isolation, although blood agar is also used, with incubation at 37°C in a candle jar or under 5% carbon dioxide. The isolate should be serotyped because the information may be needed for vaccine selection and epidemiology. Biochemical characteristics can be used to differentiate this organism from other bacteria that cause important diseases of ducks and turkeys, particularly Escherichia coli and Pasteurella multocida . Impression smears help to determine whether chlamydia is involved.

    Careful management practices are important for prevention of infection. Rigid sanitation and depopulation are necessary for elimination of the disease. A bacterin and, more recently, a live vaccine, which include the 3 most common immunotypes of R anatipestifer , are available for use in ducks. An autogenous oil-emulsion bacterin can be used in turkeys. A combination of penicillin and streptomycin, or sulfaquinoxaline can be used for initial treatment, but an antibiotic sensitivity test should be performed.
     
  8. Shadowhills Farm

    Shadowhills Farm Chillin' With My Peeps

    903
    4
    131
    Nov 14, 2009
    Crystal River, Fl
    Thanks rainplace. Motley is about 4 months old, if that helps any.
     
  9. rainplace

    rainplace Interstellar Duck Academy

    I'm not a vet and have so far never had a sick duck. If you think you should take Motley to the vet, and you have the means, then that's what I would do. I cannot diagnose anything only show you what I'm finding as I search. I would make sure to isolate her from the rest of the flock until you either get her to the vet, you determine what it is, or she gets better. I wish I could be more help [​IMG]
     
  10. Shadowhills Farm

    Shadowhills Farm Chillin' With My Peeps

    903
    4
    131
    Nov 14, 2009
    Crystal River, Fl
    I'm not a vet and have so far never had a sick duck. If you think you should take Motley to the vet, and you have the means, then that's what I would do. I cannot diagnose anything only show you what I'm finding as I search. I would make sure to isolate her from the rest of the flock until you either get her to the vet, you determine what it is, or she gets better. I wish I could be more help hugs

    We've never had a sick duck either [​IMG] I really don't have the money to pay for a vet bill, but I've been talking with my fiancee and he said either go to the vet, get her better or she has to be put down.....

    She is isolated in a dog crate right next to me so I can keep a close eye on her


    Thanks for your help.[​IMG]
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by