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Help getting started!!!

Discussion in 'Raising Baby Chicks' started by chickenliver, Jun 29, 2007.

  1. chickenliver

    chickenliver New Egg

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    Jun 29, 2007
    I'm new to chickens, and I'm interested in silky bantams. I don't know how to go around getting them, where to put them, how to feed them - I'm pretty much in the dark about everything [​IMG]. Also, are bantams good to get started, or would another breed be better?
    We have a shed 8x8, so we probably can't have very many chicks, but how do we get it ready for the chickens?
    Thanks a lot!!!
     
  2. chicken_love

    chicken_love Out Of The Brooder

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    Jun 30, 2007
    Wouldn't 8x8 be room for quite a lot of chicks? How much space is there outside?
     
  3. justusnak

    justusnak Flock Mistress

    chickenliver. Converting the shed to a useable coop is relatively easy. It needs to be dry, and draft free and predator proof.They will need an outside run, covered to keep the hawks out. They will need one nest box, per 3 hens.The Nest boxes should be about 8 to 10 inches off the ground for bantys. Mine would rather use the floor than a nest box.
    They will need a roost...for evenings. Again..not too high up. You will need feed containers, and water containers. You can get them at most any farm supply store.

    If you are ordering, or buying peeps. ( day olds) They will need to be in a brooder, inside, at 95 degrees for the first week, then decrease by 5 degrees a week. You will need chick starter for them untill they are at least 20 weeks old.
    I suggest you go to your local library, and read up on raiseing chickens. There is really so much to learn. Have fun!
     
  4. chickenliver

    chickenliver New Egg

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    Thank you so much! That's really helpful. Hopefully I'll be able to get some chicks pretty soon, and we can change the shed to a coop. Thanks [​IMG]
     
  5. allen wranch

    allen wranch Overrun With Chickens Premium Member

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    San Marcos, TX
    I suggest buying a few poultry books and researching some before getting the chicks. We were all new poultry owners once, and reading about poultry care helps you to prepare for what to expect.

    One of the best books is Storey's Guide to Raising Chickens by Gail Dameron. You can find it at Tractor Supply and on line. Another is Barnyard in your Backyard, also by Gail Dameron.
     
  6. dlhunicorn

    dlhunicorn Human Encyclopedia

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    Last edited: Jun 30, 2007
  7. chicken_love

    chicken_love Out Of The Brooder

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    justusnak:
    how do you keep the nesting box 95 degrees?
     
  8. sara

    sara Title Needed Here

    use a heat lamp to keep your brooder at 95 degrees. [​IMG]
     
  9. chicken_love

    chicken_love Out Of The Brooder

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    Does it have to be exactly 95, or can it be a little less/more?
     
  10. TheOLDNewChick

    TheOLDNewChick I'm an original

    Jun 12, 2007
    Tioga, Louisiana
    It needs to be as close to 95 as you can get it for the first week. A couple degrees less shouldn't hurt, just make sure it isn't TOO much more than 95. You need to clip the heat lamp to one corner of the brooder, and leave a dark corner for them to get in in case they get hot. Make sure you keep the water in the cool corner. Good luck!
     

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