Help! Goat Problem

Discussion in 'Other Pets & Livestock' started by MidnightChickenLover, Jan 12, 2010.

  1. MidnightChickenLover

    MidnightChickenLover Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Friday we found our goat in her stall. She wouldn't move. She was laying down with head up, a little shakey, and she was bawling. She would eat and drink a little at a time. We checked on her about 30 minutes later and the back of her head was touching her spine, she was on her side, and her leggs were stiff and straight. The vet came, and told us that she would either be better in two days, or she wouldn't be alive. She's still alive, we are still giving her pain medication, electrolites, and B vitamins, that the vet told us to. We see little improvements, but she is still laying on her side, can't lift her head, and only can move a little bit with her legs. We have now gotten her to eat hay, but we have also noticed a feew other things. She blanks out, she'll be chewing on hay, and she'll stop moveing completely for 15 secs and then she'll come back. Also when we turn her onto her other side, a part of her stomach moves like there is something in there, it may just be her stomach, but we don't know. HELP, please!
    I need some help ASAP! Thanks!
     
    Last edited: Jan 12, 2010
  2. jenjscott

    jenjscott Mosquito Beach Poultry

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    Have you tried posting this over in backyard herds? I don't know much about goats How old is she? Its not that encephalitis is it?
     
  3. MidnightChickenLover

    MidnightChickenLover Chillin' With My Peeps

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    She was born early december 2008
     
  4. Rafter 7 Paint Horses

    Rafter 7 Paint Horses Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jan 13, 2007
    East Texas
    What did the vet say it was?
    It sounds like Tetanus.

    Jean
     
  5. dutchhollow

    dutchhollow Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Google 'goat polio'. High doses of vit b (I think that is it, haven't had any goat problems in a few years and out of practice). And you need to find another vet asap!
     
  6. krazykritterlady

    krazykritterlady Out Of The Brooder

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    Try giving large doses of Vitamin B. When one of my goats got sick, I got Thiamine injections from my vet. The vet also gave an IV injection of Thiamine. My goat came through fine and is doing well. I always keep Vitamin B tablets on hand. If one of my goats start looking a little strange, I crush the tablets into a powder and put that on bread. Making them a little sandwich treat. I also have the guy that mixes my feed add extra Vitamin B into their feed. This has been working great for me. Hope your goat is feeling better.
     
  7. greenfamilyfarms

    greenfamilyfarms Big Pippin'

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    Quote:Maybe. Sounds like it could also be Polio The behaviors sound like the symptom of star gazing and stiffness. Here's some info:

    Poliomyelitis (Thiamin Deficiency) in Goats
    By Coni Ross, AMGA Regional Coordinator

    This is not disease of neglect. Usually, there is bacteria present, that inhibits the absorption of thiamin, or consumes the thiamin, therefore preventing absorption by the goat. Thiamin and glucose are imperative for function of the nervous system. Many times, the culpable bacteria are Clostridia species, but not necessarily. It seems most prevalent in animals on small grain fields, but can happen on fresh green pasture, or any time. Thiaminase producing plants or bacteria are involved, which can cause a change in pH of the digestive tract, killing normal bacteria, and inducing a Thiamin deficiency.
    Presentation can vary. Most of the time, the classic symptoms are star gazing, and stiffness. The goat may be blind. The symptoms may closely mimic Tetanus. To differentiate, check the goat's eyelid: Tickle the eyelashes, if the third eyelid flashes across, tetanus can be suspected, if not, this is Polio. A variety of symptoms may present. Paralysis of rear legs, weakness of all extremities, or only one leg, and or blindness. The onset of the disease may be over several days, or several hours. The most severe cases progress rapidly from weakness to complete paralysis, coma, and death if not treated.

    Treatment: The most effective treatment I have used, is composed of support of the neurological system, restoring natural bacterial balance of rumen bacteria, and support of hydration and nutrition. I prefer to use a powdered live probiotic product to help reestablish the normal bacteria, but most any product will do, as long as it is live, and not just a by-product of live bacteria. Thiamin in an injectable form is imperative. B Complex will help, but usually is not a high enough dose to reverse the disease process unless caught very early. I prefer to give 500 mg. Thiamin IM as a first dose, followed by a second dose of 250 mg. that same day. Thiamin is water-soluble and is excreted very rapidly. The absence of Thiamin causes death of millions or brain cells, so quick recognition and treatment is imperative. The Thiamin should be given at least daily until recovery is complete, but, injectable Thiamin may be given by month on day three and after normal bacterial balance is restored. I usually give a weight appropriate dose of penicillin on day one and two to help control any systemic bacteria, since this is drug of choice for clostridia species bacteria.

    Keep the goat in a protected area from sun or rain. If the goat is blind put it where it can find feed and water until it recovers. It may be necessary to drench or tube, the goat that can't swallow, with an electrolyte-sugar product. They usually recover, but the time involved in recovery usually depends of the severity of the disease prior to treatment. The recovery of a blind goat takes longer, but they will recover given proper treatment. This method works well for me.

    http://www.breedersworld.com/phorum/read.php?4,458731,458758
     
    Last edited: Jan 13, 2010
  8. MidnightChickenLover

    MidnightChickenLover Chillin' With My Peeps

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    We gave her vitamin b, she was in our heated garage, while we tried to cure her. The vet came out today and put her to sleep. R.I.P. Belle [​IMG]
     
  9. Skyesrocket

    Skyesrocket Chillin' With My Peeps

    Mar 20, 2008
    Sorry to hear that she didn't make it. Did the vet say what was wrong with her?
     
  10. dutchhollow

    dutchhollow Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Very Sorry for your loss. Please try to find another vet before one of your other goats comes down with something. Yours would't even pick up a book or get online to try to help your animal, very sad.
     

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