HELP!! Hen with a twisted foot and leg

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by koohlman, Jun 30, 2016.

  1. koohlman

    koohlman Just Hatched

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    Jun 28, 2016
    My wife and I inherited some hens after some kids decided to use themail as a prank at her school one is just fine the other has a twisted foot that we didn't think much about since some places that we read said that it doesn't cause problems, they were wrong on that her leg is now all twisted and she doesn't want to put any weight on it at all we went to a vet and he said that we should be thinking about putting her down. Both my wife and myself don't want to loose such a beautiful bird so we are wanting to know what things we can do to help her out.[​IMG]
    she lays down like that all the time
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    [​IMG]
    I am sorry the pictures don't really show well what is happening but her left leg twists into the other.
    Please if you know of anything that we can do to help her out we need all the help that we can get.
     
  2. lcertuche

    lcertuche Chillin' With My Peeps

    I would hate to lose a hen so I would probably try to splint the foot and tape it. Also, put it into a small area where the hen can't move around to much. Keep water and feed close. She will probably just nap, which is a good thing. In a couple of days you should know if it is better or not. If after a couple of days she looks like she's not any better or worse yet, suffering then go ahead and put her down.
     
  3. koohlman

    koohlman Just Hatched

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    Jun 28, 2016
    Thank you I will give it a try
     
  4. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive True BYC Addict

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    She may have a leg bone deformity or a vitamin B 2 (riboflavin) defiency. Long term riboflavin deficiency can cause curled toe paralysis which can be permanent if not treated early. I would give some poultry vitamins with minerals. Rooster Booster has one called Poultry Booster that goes in the feed, or you can give her some BComplex ground into her feed or water. The hock tendon in leg bone deformities can eventually rupture. She may be able to live in a small area near food and water with some extra attention, as previously said by others.
     

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