Help! I have Infectious Coryza in my flock

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by iluv..., Dec 5, 2010.

  1. iluv...

    iluv... Out Of The Brooder

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    Oct 4, 2010
    California
    I had a couple of Silkies that had one eye swollen like the one in the picture below that was emitting a foul odor. After searching the forum and web I came to the solution that I have Infectious Coryza in my flock.
    I already cull those Silkies and also a couple of other that showed signs of having it that also had a foul odor from the nasal/ eye area as soon as I realized what it was because I was afraid it might affect the rest of them. What I am afraid of [​IMG], which is probably true, is that it already spread beyond repair because I still smelled that nasty odor.

    The chicken(s) who I think my chicks got it from I had gotten them through Craigslist go figure.[​IMG]

    My questions are do I cull all the 3 month olds or just keep killing off all the ones who show symptoms of having it?[​IMG]
    Or should I treat them with Albon, Di-Methox, Sulfa-Max, SulfaSure, gallimycin, Aureomycin?

    However they will remain carrier for Infectious Coryza even after they are cured.
    Do I want to put possible future chicks at risk?
    I was planning on doing another round of raising days old next year.

    I am so distraught about making that decision because this is my first time raising chicken from babies!

    Any advices or recommendations is greatly needed.

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Dec 6, 2010
  2. DANNY

    DANNY Chillin' With My Peeps

    Mar 27, 2009
    GAINESVILLE, GEORGIA
    I use tylan 50 about 1 to 1 1/2 cc injected (according to the size of the bird )in the meaty part of the breast every other day. You should see signs of improvement in a couple of days. Try to keep their eyes opened a few times a day to allow them to see how to eat and drink.
    Good Luck
    Danny
     
  3. iluv...

    iluv... Out Of The Brooder

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    Oct 4, 2010
    California
    Quote:Thanks!
    I'll try it and see how it goes.
    So far none of them have problems seeing, eating, and drinking other than the ones I have already culled.
    However I can still smell that "odor."
     
  4. tammyd57

    tammyd57 Chillin' With My Peeps

    To be honest, I would cull all of them and start over. If they are carriers even if they are cured, you will never be able to add to your flock without some becoming ill or dying. You won't be able to sell them, at least not with a clear conscience.
    NEVER add chickens to your existing flock without quarantining them. This is exactly why.
    I'm sorry if that sounds harsh, I don't mean it that way, I know this must be awful for you.
     
    TarantuLady likes this.
  5. DANNY

    DANNY Chillin' With My Peeps

    Mar 27, 2009
    GAINESVILLE, GEORGIA
    Sorry !
     
    Last edited: Dec 6, 2010
  6. speckledhen

    speckledhen Intentional Solitude Premium Member

    Coryza makes them carriers almost every time, though, Danny. I don't want a immuno-compromised flock, and if you keep birds who have had it, you are setting yourself up to treat illness over and over again. Chickens do not get colds as such. I won't treat respiratory illnesses in chickens (have never had any so far, thank goodness, not in the entire time I've kept them) and neither will most long0-time breeders because so many of them are like herpes type viruses, do not respond to antibiotics and never are truly well afterward. Anyone who treats Coryza or CRD should never sell a bird from their flock to anyone, IMO.
     
  7. DANNY

    DANNY Chillin' With My Peeps

    Mar 27, 2009
    GAINESVILLE, GEORGIA
    I went back and read about about both sinusitus and coryza and thats obviously not what I had seen. I am thinking that it was an eye infection caused by feathers getting into the eye because it was on silkies and polish and it cleared right up and never affected anybody else. I am always learning. Every time I think I know something I find out its more complicated.
     
    Last edited: Dec 6, 2010
  8. deerman

    deerman Rest in Peace 1949-2012

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    Southern Ohio
    Yes sad to say....yes cull everyone of them....not only for your future chicken , but for others in your area...wild birds will go from flock to flock.. Some States when chicken get some diseases they will make you cull the whole flock.
     
  9. speckledhen

    speckledhen Intentional Solitude Premium Member

    Quote:Ain't that always the way it is? [​IMG]
     
  10. iluv...

    iluv... Out Of The Brooder

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    Oct 4, 2010
    California
    I had actually kept the infected chicken(s) in question quarantined in a Chick-N-Hutch away from my chicks. However they were they still in the backyard so it was probably spread through the air:

    "Transmission occurs by direct bird to bird contact, inhalation of infectious aerosols coughed into the air, or through ingestion of contaminated feed and water. The organism can be transferred on contaminated clothing, equipment and fomites."(http://www.peafowl.org/ARTICLES/15/).

    I'm going to go ahead with Tylan and we'll see where it goes from there. Any that are doing worse I'll just have to cull. I won't be adding any chickens or selling any.


    I think this might be the first and last time I will be raising chicks.
    I don't think I can take it. I was already crying when I had to cull the first set.

    I may have forgotten to mention but we are talking about a good amount of possible infected birds.

    Btw: I wanted to know if it's safe for human consumption. My mom thinks it's going to be a waste if just throw them away after we kill them. [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Dec 6, 2010

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