Help! Impacted crop?

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by Slg140, Jun 14, 2018.

  1. Slg140

    Slg140 In the Brooder

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    I have a one year old golden comet who I noticed had gotten very thin and had a pale comb. I treated her and the rest of the flock for worms last night, when I went to let them out this morning her comb looked better but I realized her crop was full and hard.

    I’ve seperated her and tried to massage her crop after giving her bread soaked in olive oil. Her crop will move/spread out when I massage it, but not empty. I’ve taken her off food and am only giving her water for now. Is there anything else I can do?
     
  2. Chloe+chickens=LOVE

    Chloe+chickens=LOVE Chirping

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    Keep rubbing her crop then turn her upside down for it to come out. Keep me updated
     
    SimsFarmFresh and BlackHackle like this.
  3. rebrascora

    rebrascora Crowing

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    Can you just clarify that she had no access to food before you let them out this morning?

    Vomiting chickens by holding them upside down is risky and should not be undertaken without understanding the risks and doing some research on correct technique. In the first instance of an impacted crop I would not attempt vomiting unless the crop is so full of fluids that massaging it will risk it refluxing and pose a risk of aspiration anyway.
    If the crop has not emptied over night and is firm/hard then removing access to solid food and sometimes any bedding that can be ingested is important and providing only very sloppy food made by soaking chick crumb or regular layer crumbles/pellets in water until they are mush and adding a little oil to it (bread can lead to sour crop so best avoided) and massage the crop for 10 mins or so 3-4 times a day and see if you make any progress with breaking it up.
    It is also important to check for any abdominal swelling. Crops can be slow or impacted due to an object or mass (often vegetation) preventing food from travelling further down the digestive tract but the problem may also be caused by a blockage in the lower gut. Reproductive problems are often the root of the issue and will usually be associated with some abdominal swelling between the legs or below the vent.
     
    Last edited: Jun 14, 2018
  4. Chloe+chickens=LOVE

    Chloe+chickens=LOVE Chirping

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    Thank you for correcting me people always told me that's what you do.
     
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  5. rebrascora

    rebrascora Crowing

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    I was more trying to clarify than correcting you. There are occasions when vomiting impacted chickens is the right course of action, but it is important to understand the risks and weigh them against the benefits. A chicken can suck vomit into their lungs if they are panicking and gasping for air whilst they are being held upside down and that can be more serious than the impaction. Also if the impaction is hard, trying to vomit them will not provide any benefit but still incur the risk. It's just better to try other less risky options before doing it.
     
  6. SimsFarmFresh

    SimsFarmFresh In the Brooder

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    Withhold food, provide lots of water, provide grit and massage crop from the very bottom up.
     
  7. SimsFarmFresh

    SimsFarmFresh In the Brooder

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    Withhold food until crop empties. Just pointing out what is obvious to some may not be to others.
     
  8. rebrascora

    rebrascora Crowing

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    I am now of the opinion that giving grit for an impacted crop is not a good idea. Firstly because the crop does not have a thick strong lining like the gizzard which is designed to massage grit and food together to break it down, so there is a risk of the lining of the crop becoming scratched and aggravated and inflamed if you are massaging with grit in there. Secondly, if you have an impaction, putting grit in there will just add to it.
    Most crop impactions are due to ravelled masses of vegetation (grass, straw etc) that act like a sieve. Fine particulate matter and fluids can usually pass through, especially with a bit of massage but aggregates like grains and grit get clogged up in it.
     
  9. rebrascora

    rebrascora Crowing

    6,184
    6,479
    496
    Feb 14, 2014
    Consett Co.Durham. UK
    I am now of the opinion that giving grit for an impacted crop is not a good idea. Firstly because the crop does not have a thick strong lining like the gizzard which is designed to massage grit and food together to break it down, so there is a risk of the lining of the crop becoming scratched and aggravated and inflamed if you are massaging with grit in there. Secondly, if you have an impaction, putting grit in there will just add to it.
    Most crop impactions are due to ravelled masses of vegetation (grass, straw etc) that act like a sieve. Fine particulate matter and fluids can usually pass through, especially with a bit of massage but aggregates like grains and grit get clogged up in it.
     
    Sofia Salazar likes this.
  10. SimsFarmFresh

    SimsFarmFresh In the Brooder

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    Grit is recommended by veterinarians for impacted crops. Fine granite grit though. Nothing larger than a piece of sand. And only a tiny amount. It helps break down the grass or whatever is lodged while you are massaging it.
     

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