Help! My Cochin (large) Roo is limping!

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by wildknives, Apr 3, 2017.

  1. wildknives

    wildknives Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I have a very nice cochin roo that is limping when he walks and lays down alot. I can take pics and post them. one of his center pads is peach pit sized and the good one is gumball sized.
     
  2. allosaurusrock

    allosaurusrock Chillin' With My Peeps

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    He might have bumble foot. I'd give his feet a good, warm bath, and try to pit a little anti-infection ointment on his foot and bandage it, if you can get him from picking on it too much.
     
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  3. aart

    aart Chicken Juggler! Premium Member

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  4. Tirtzah

    Tirtzah Just Hatched

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    Wildknives***Sorry to hear that! I know your roo is in pain if it is limping and lying down a lot! It is hard to diagnose something without seeing the bird but I can tell you what to look for on the bottom of it's bad foot and if you find it, then I can tell you what it is and what to do for it also!

    Take a look at the under side of your roo's bad foot that is so swollen. Also using your fingers, have someone else hold the bird for you and manipulate the bottom of roo's swollen foot with your fingers by pressing into it's foot pad. Also with your fingers, starting in the center of it's foot pad and moving your thumbs towards the outsides,,,(one thumb in one direction, like to the right and the other thumb moving towards the left), pressing into the pad at the same time as you are do this. Then do the same thing starting on the outsides of his bad foot and moving towards the center, equally, with both thumbs, also pressing slightly into the foot pad while doing so.

    What you are trying to either "see" or "feel" is looking to see if roo has what seems to look or feel like a hardened pea or BB pellet just under the outer flesh on its bad foot. If you find it then the diagnosis I would feel safe to say would be called: "Bumble Foot". This is
    a very common type of infection that these birds can pick up in their foot pads. The majority of the time the cause is walking around in litter that is not just dirty, but wet as well and usually has a very unpleasant odor to it! Sometimes the odor is that of smelling mold. Other times the odor smells more like dirty ammonia. Initially though, the cause results from that which begins a breakdown in the flesh pads of their feet. This can be caused by the perches which the birds roost on being made of plastic...or else not having available to them a variety of different types of perches. If all of their perches are round or all of them are square, etc., along with the bird being a little on the "lazy" side, maybe even a bit overweight, thus spending a good deal of time on their perches. It could also have to do with having a lack of a particular nutrient or nutrients in their diet. Either or both of these initial causes results in beginning a breakdown of the flesh pads of their feet. Once the flesh begins to break down, as they then walk around in dirty litter, especially if it is moist or wet, allowing the Staph infection to get a hold and perfect conditions for this bacteria abound to grow and flourish. This bacteria finds a weakness and breakdown At the end, I will hook you up with a good website or two on this, detailing just what all types of perches are recommended to be made available to them, as well as, which nutrients that are lacking in their diets that can contribute to causing this breakdown in their flesh...

    Depending on how tough of a stomach you have and if you are both comfortable and used to medically treating your flock, it is possible for you to treat your roo yourself, or tell a friend/relative (that has a tougher stomach) what to do. First thing is getting that infection out.
    You can try soaking it's foot in some warm water, (as hot as can be, without burning it's foot), that has Epsom Salt mixed well in the water.
    Will need to have a teaspoon of the Epsom Salt per quart of water. (32 oz)...After soaking it's foot for about 20 minutes, take a look at it and see if simply squeezing the infected part will pop the infection and allow the pus to drain out? If not, then you can try this a second time. However, if this still does not work or if the infection feels very hard to the touch, like there is a BB pellet in it's foot, just under the skin/flesh, then it will be necessary to go after it with a knife. If you find this to be the only option facing you to get out the infection, then you may want to first "hypnotize" your roo! You can do this by simply turning the bird over onto it's back lying belly up. Just use long, slow strokes to soothe your roo while it's lying there belly facing up. Birds immediately will succumb to this and go into a deep and complete relaxed mode!!! Once roo is in this relaxed trance like state of peacefulness, you can proceed to sterilize a really sharp knife with alcohol or peroxide and cut slightly under and into the flesh of it's foot pad to either drain it out or pick it out.

    Once you get it (that infection that looks like a hardened pea or a BB pellet), then you will need to use a syringe, (can obtain for free from any Pharmacist. Be sure to let them know you don't need the needle, just the syringe itself. Unless you want to keep one on hand, in case you have a future event where one of your animals gets an abscess and you need to puncture it and draw out the infection). Anyway, once you obtain a syringe, (pick up some hydrogen peroxide if you don't have any at home, while you are at the drug store). Once you arrive back home and have successfully cut out the infection (hardened pea or BB pellet), then you will want to push the plunger all the way down on your syringe. Placing the syringe into the peroxide bottle, slowly pull back on the plunger, making sure that the syringe is totally submerged into the peroxide and not just sitting on top of it or you will just draw a lot of air.

    Now take the syringe and insert the syringe end directly into the hole where you cut out the infection and pushing down on the plunger, doing so very strongly so as to use the force of the liquid peroxide flow to push out or force out any remaining infection that is still in there. Once you have done that a few times, (doing it until what you see coming out is completely clear liquid peroxide without any cloudiness, or funky discolorations)...then you are ready to administer a liquified form of an antibiotic into the hole where the infection was.

    Some Vets will write you a Prescription that you just go to their place and pick up to go get it filled, (or they may even just call it in to your Pharmacy for you). Another option is that places such as Tractor Supply and some Feed & Seed Stores will carry some basic medications, prescription strength liquid antibiotics, etc., which they can sell straight to you, over the counter, available without a prescription. (CAUTION: Just need to read bottle and make sure that the liquid contained in the product is to be administered "p. o." (meaning "by mouth") and that it is not one of the liquid meds that is to be administered either "sub-subcutaneously," ("under the skin"), or either "IM" or "IV", (meaning "intramuscularly" muscle or "intraveinously" vein...as these would also come in a "liquid" form)! In addition to using a new clean syringe to push some antibiotic into the wound, it may also be necessary for roo to be on an oral antibiotic? All depending upon how infected it's foot is and how long it has been infected? If the foot does not get better after cleaning out the infection, flushing it out with peroxide and then pushing liquid antibiotic in the wound and wrapping it up well, then it just may be necessary to administer a course of antibiotics p.o. or, by mouth for a week or so.

    The only thing else I can think of to relate to you on this is to pass along a good website for you to read up on "bumble foot" in chickens. I found this site that I thought was well written and explained this topic well...One site I found was this one:

    https://www.beautyofbirds.com/bumblefoot.html

    http://www.tillysnest.com/2015/12/non-surgical-bumblefoot-treatment-html/

    Hope this information was helpful to you and that your roo gets all better soon!
    Tirtzah
     
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  5. wildknives

    wildknives Chillin' With My Peeps

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    yes I have him in forced confinement. (dog crate lol) I will soak his feet in the morning. I'm afraid he has a feather inside his one foot.
     
    Last edited: Apr 5, 2017
  6. wildknives

    wildknives Chillin' With My Peeps

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    [​IMG]

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  7. aart

    aart Chicken Juggler! Premium Member

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    His entire foot, lower leg, and all toes look pretty swollen up.
    How old is this bird and what does he eat?
    Did this happen all of sudden or have they been swollen for awhile?
     
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  8. wildknives

    wildknives Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I dont know the age, he was gifted to me with some hens. I have had him about 1.5 years. This just started in the last week.
    He eats layer mash and cracked corn/corn scratch and some beet pulp. I'm in central FL. He is an older guy.
     
    Last edited: Apr 6, 2017
  9. wildknives

    wildknives Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Feather impaction or bumble foot?
     
  10. aart

    aart Chicken Juggler! Premium Member

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    Could be both, and more.....that protrusion on left of center pad on far left looks like it could be an infected wound (bumblefoot).
    The overall swelling of legs and feet makes me think maybe gout.....which can be caused by too much calcium in feed.
    IMO non-laying birds shouldn't eat layer feed, some it doesn't seem to bother but others it can cause problems.
    Sorry, I have no finite diagnosis and/or treatment for you.
     
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