Help my little white bantam leg horn is sick

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by lilofthestars, Mar 16, 2017.

  1. lilofthestars

    lilofthestars Out Of The Brooder

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    Oct 9, 2015
    I noticed yesterday about her comb was limp, I found out through a knowledgeable person that can be normal. She was fluffed up this morning.
    Yesterday I watched her in the yard, was was slow, shaking her little head. I went to the feed store I got some liquid vitamins gave her some to keep her immune system up. They have a high protein diet. They used to run across the street where the neighbor puts out wild bird seed where the wild birds went, could she of contacted something from the wild birds? We have a large fenced in back yard where they cannot do that any longer. She was pecking at the ground yesterday, but not scratching. I have been trying to study to see if I can find out what could be wrong. We only have 4 chickens. The other ones seen fine. She is only around 2 years old. Any help would be greatly appreciated it. My husband is working, so it would be very hard for me to catch her and bring to the vet, And as I have been reading sometimes the vets cannot figure it out. Thank you in advance for any suggestions. Please if anyone is really knowledgeable about chickens I will give my phone number, I love animals I do not want to loose her so young.
     
  2. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

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    Reproductive problems such as internal laying or egg yolk peritonitis can be common in chickens. Those can have varying symptoms such as lethargy, poor appetite, a d others. Crop problems can cause a hard impacted crop, or a large puffy sour crop. Since she has been shaking her head, I would look at her crop or maybe a respiratory problem. You may want to check her crop to feel if it is empty, full, hard, soft, or puffy like a balloon. The crop should have food in it during the day, and be mostly empty in early morning. To examine her easily, I would wait until she is on the roost after dark. Then if you need to take her to a vet, you can place her in a dog crate overnight. Today I would try to get her to drink some fluids (add electrolytes and vitamins if you have them.) Adding a lot of water and mixing in a smaller amount of feed making it thin can be a food way to get them to drink. Chopped egg is a good source of protein for a sick hen.
     
  3. lilofthestars

    lilofthestars Out Of The Brooder

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    I watched her this morning she has been drinking water.
     
  4. lilofthestars

    lilofthestars Out Of The Brooder

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    Here are some pictures of her, maybe someone can see something I am missing[​IMG][/IMG][/IMG]
     
  5. lilofthestars

    lilofthestars Out Of The Brooder

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    [​IMG]
     
  6. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

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    Have you examined her crop?
     
  7. lilofthestars

    lilofthestars Out Of The Brooder

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    My husband is working all the time and I can't do that by myself. So I'm going to be bringing her to the vet in the morning
     
  8. lilofthestars

    lilofthestars Out Of The Brooder

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    Well the vet is telling me she will die.The reason is her eggs went to the wrong place. She says because batams lay so many eggs, sometimes that happens. I wish and hope she will make it.
     
  9. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

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    She probably has internal laying or egg yolk peritonitis, which was discussed in post 2. Getting her to eat and drink and keeping her comfortable and close to food is best. Some use antibiotics to treat it early. Did your vet suggest that? Her is some reading:
    http://www.theveterinaryexpert.com/backyard-poultry/egg-yolk-peritonitis/
    http://scoopfromthecoop.nutrenaworld.com/tag/laying-issues/
    http://www.chickenvet.co.uk/health-and-common-diseases/egg-laying-issues/index.aspx

    From the Merck Veterinary Manual:

    Internal Laying

    In these hens, partially or fully formed eggs are found in the abdominal cavity. Such eggs reach the cavity by reverse peristalsis of the oviduct. If they have no shell, they are often misshapen because of partial or complete absorption of the contents. Frequently, only empty shell membranes are present. No control or treatment is known. This condition is related to erratic ovulation and defective egg syndrome (see Defective or Abnormal Eggs in Poultry).

    Egg Yolk Peritonitis

    Egg peritonitis is characterized by fibrin or albumen-like material with a cooked appearance among the abdominal viscera. It is a common cause of sporadic death in layers or breeder hens, but in some flocks may become the major cause of death before or after reaching peak production and give the appearance of a contagious disease. It is diagnosed at necropsy. Peritonitis follows reverse movement of albumen and Escherichia coli bacteria from the oviduct into the abdomen. If the incidence is high, culture should be done to differentiate between Pasteurella (fowl cholera) or Salmonella infection. Antibiotic treatment of peritonitis caused by E coli infections is usually ineffective. Management of body weight and uniformity, reproductive development (ovary follicle growth and maturation), and drinking water sanitation are the best preventive strategies.
    When hens have too many large ovarian follicles, a problem described as erratic oviposition and defective egg syndrome (EODES) is seen in broiler breeders. This condition is accompanied by a high incidence of double-yolked eggs, prolapses of the oviduct, internal ovulation, and/or internal laying that often results in egg peritonitis and mortality. EODES is prevented by avoiding light stimulation of underweight pullets too early and by following guidelines for body weight and uniformity, and lighting recommendations for each breeder strain. Overweight hens may also have a higher incidence of erratic ovulations and mortality associated with egg peritonitis.
     
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