Help my pullet got scalped!!!

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by chicksandhens, Mar 24, 2012.

  1. chicksandhens

    chicksandhens Out Of The Brooder

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    Apr 27, 2011
    Hi everybody, I need help on treating 9 week old pullet.
    I originally had 2 RR and and one black austolorp, and last night I purchased to 9 week old pullets (I hope they're pullets). I put them in with my other birds and this morning when I checked one was bleeding and they were both hiding from the old RR. She doesn't seem to be lathargic or anything. But when I examined her all of the feathers skin and all had been pecked off [​IMG]. I sprayed some wound-kote on it, but I don't know if there is anything else that I can do for her. Does anyone have any suggestions?
     
  2. CMV

    CMV Flock Mistress

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    You need to separate them until you can integrate them properly. Here's a link on how you can do that:

    https://www.backyardchickens.com/a/adding-to-your-flock

    You will need to wait until all wounds are healed or nearly so. Either way, they need to be nearly invisible.

    Good luck.
     
  3. chicksandhens

    chicksandhens Out Of The Brooder

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    Apr 27, 2011
    Thanks, CMV. I just read the article there was alot of good info on there. I do currently have them seperated. Do you know how well chickens heal from this type of injury. I'm concerned now as to how this pullet is going to fare.
     
  4. CMV

    CMV Flock Mistress

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    Apr 15, 2009
    Integration is always a difficult time...and not just for the chickens. I dread integrations because of the unknowns involved...are they all going to get along? Are there going to be any injuries? Am I going to keep a close enough eye on them to prevent something bad from happening? If something bad does happen, could I have stopped it by being more vigilant?... The whole thing makes me nuts!

    Your bird is going to heal up so fast you will be amazed. Chickens are really resilient. Not just physically, either. You will be surprised how quickly they eventually resolve this issue and form a cohesive flock. It's just that (you and) they have to get through the introductory period. And that period is the worst part.

    Treat the wounds with either Blukote or plain Neosporin. She should be fine in no time. When the wounds are nearly healed you can cover them in Blukote and that will mask them enough that she should be able to tackle integrations. Try to do it slower than the original plan. Chickens need a slow introductory period to remind them that they actually like other chickens and want them to be around. They sometimes forget that.
     
  5. SpeckledHills

    SpeckledHills Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Idaho/Utah
    From what I've heard, chickens frequently heal from amazing wounds.

    If you can set up a heat lamp she can always get close to while she's regrowing feathers, that's one thing that would be a help to her.

    If you think at some point that she's battling infection & you want to give her an internal antibiotic, as well, Penicillin or Amoxicillin would probably be the best one for a wound infection. If she has any tears in her skin, rather than stitching you can Super-Glue them back together. Really! It can work very well!

    Putting obstacles around for chickens to run around & hide behind could help some for future reintegration if you want to do that later. Here's some info I wrote before about that:
    _____________________________________________

    You can put some obstacles in the coop to help out chickens that are getting picked on too much. These give the chickens something to hide behind, jump onto and run around while evading attacks from other chickens.

    ***Always be sure no blocked-off or dead-end areas are created where any chicken could get cornered.***

    Sacks of feed, buckets, additional perches, trash cans, etc. can be useful.

    Window frames (with either glass or wire in the middle) leaned against things can also be excellent for a flee-er to run behind and be protected yet be able to keep track of aggressor's travels. Window frames are even better if you can nail them so they are stand vertically and are at 90 degree angle to the wall. Then a fleeing chicken can also have the option to jump up and perch on the top edge to escape, and pursuer can't immediately chase her if she jumps down on the opposite side.

    Lower-ranking chickens also appreciate shadowy, cluttered areas where they can hang out and not be noticed as much.

    It helps to put food & water in some of these areas so less-dominant chickens still get plenty to eat and drink.

    _____________________________________________
    I'm so sorry your pullet got hurt. [​IMG] Established hens can be so crabby with newcomers sometimes.
    Best wishes!
     

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