HELP new roo emergency!

Discussion in 'Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying' started by chickensval, Aug 5, 2013.

  1. chickensval

    chickensval Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jun 12, 2013
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    One of my hens hatched a few eggs a while back. None of the eggs were hers. I got free fertile eggs from a friend. Unknown breed. Only 3 hatched out of the dozen and one was a rooster. The other two were hens. The rooster was very mean ever since he was a baby. He would visciously bite me anytime I would walk into the coop to change the food or water or collect eggs, or if I was just in the coop to check on them. Now the three that she hatched are quite old, just not laying yet. The big room we used to have died. But he's lived with the little rooster for as long as I can remember. Now the little too took over. He's starting to crow (it sounds very funny:D) and he boots me every time I walk in the coop, along with his pecking. He pecked me really hard yesterday and now I have a scratch on my arm from it. I have 6 hens including the other two the hen hatched. And today I bought a bantam rooster. He is absolutely BEAUTIFUL. He's fully grown and gets his "business" done by fertilizing the eggs. Well, this little young roo seems to be picking on the banty quite a bit. He attacks the little bantam every 15 seconds. How can I stop this behavior? I would consider getting rid of the young rooster if I have to. He's just a bit TOO mean . none of my other roosters acted like this before.
     
    Last edited: Aug 5, 2013
  2. chickensval

    chickensval Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Mobile, Alabama
    Sorry if its not making since, computer changed the word "roo" to "room", or "too". LOL. Hope this helps you figure out what I meant. Sorry.
     
  3. chooks4life

    chooks4life Overrun With Chickens

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    As you have observed, mean roos are quite literally born that way. There is no definite trigger, though there can be stimulation to act on buried instinct, but this is an inherited pattern of behavior that will surface sooner or later, and sooner rather than later usually. It is highly heritable. His own father was almost certainly a nasty roo as well, and he will father nasty sons in turn.

    I would cull him or rehome him to someone who will cull before he grows out his spurs and starts ripping you to pieces. They can kill even fully grown humans, and are fully capable of inflicting permanent damage.

    It's a shame when they turn out so bad but many people have tried and so far I have yet to hear from anyone who managed to permanently 'cure' a roo of his violence. Many people get the roo to stop for a week or more but he really is 'bad to the bone' and preventing a desire to attack from being fulfilled often just strengthens it. Caging him will not help, his offspring will likely also need caging... It is a strong trait. The mental pattern he automatically runs along does not vanish just because he is prevented one way or another from following it to conclusion; the urge to attack is always there. Mental aberration solidified into inherited instinct of a twisted kind.

    It has nothing to do with his being a male, there are countless great maleswho prove that theory wrong. He is what happens when people keep nasty roos and make sure they pass their traits on. Chooks don't just pass on standard instincts and genes, they also pass on behavioral patterns that the parents repeated during their lifetimes; the same is true of all livestock. What animals do often in their lives, and the environment they do it in, switches some genes on and others off, and as they adapt their offspring are tailored to the environment and situation the parents lived in.
     
    Last edited: Aug 5, 2013
  4. chickensval

    chickensval Chillin' With My Peeps

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    This is a great post. And very helpful. Thank you and I am considering culling him. I really appreciate your help
    Val
     
  5. chooks4life

    chooks4life Overrun With Chickens

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    I hope you find what works for you in your situation. While I don't think you'll achieve successful retraining if you attempt that, I would also wish you all the best with that if it was your choice, and the same if you choose to cull. He does sound like an especially bent piece of work. Some get clever and wait until they have a good shot at your face, since that is their natural target against any enemy. They can be such terrors. Always a shame when they turn out like that. Anyway, best wishes.
     

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