Help, new to turkeys

Discussion in 'Turkeys' started by ky goat lad, Jan 29, 2011.

  1. ky goat lad

    ky goat lad Out Of The Brooder

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    Jan 29, 2011
    georgetown
    I just got 2 hens, 2 toms, 3 young hens. I have chickens( not together) but need to make sure same goes for turkeys. They where all together when I got them, I seperated them, (Toms fighting). They seem to be molting , not sure or just where they where un happy where they where keep, kinda crapped for all of them. I have them in a larger pen, purches, tunnels, treats. I just looking for little tricks to make them look really nice. Also hens are laying but where they have been moved not really making the nest , just dropping them out. When will the naturaly(no light) be fretile and nesting.
    Thanks for any help. They are standard bronze.
     
  2. Barry

    Barry Chillin' With My Peeps

    That depends on where you are located. It happens a lot sooner the farther south you are.
     
  3. ky goat lad

    ky goat lad Out Of The Brooder

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    Jan 29, 2011
    georgetown
    kentucky, I seen the toms gobble today , all tail feather up
     
  4. Olive Hill

    Olive Hill Overrun With Chickens

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    Apr 19, 2009
    Gobbling is a noise they make, what you saw is called strutting -- they will fan their tail feathers, fluff their body feathers up, drop their wings.

    I don't totally understand your original post in it's entirety but I'll try to answer as much as I can decipher. If they're cramped it's not uncommon for their feathers to get mussed up and not look great. The same can be true in wet, less than stellar weather if they're outside. With turkeys if you don't want their tail feathers to get damaged while they roost you need to place your roosts further from the walls of their enclosure than you would need to for say, chickens, because their tails are longer and will rub on the walls or fence.

    The toms fighting also could have been a space issue. If they feel cramped and overcrowded they are more likely to fight. Give them more space and they may be able to coexist peacefully.
     

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