Help please. 7 with Bumblefoot...

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by Vikinglike, Oct 21, 2019.

  1. Vikinglike

    Vikinglike Songster

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    AC8FC69F-0875-4D7F-961E-CD3F448A14D3.jpeg B0636252-8107-433D-90F4-1EF9256098C8.jpeg 40893252-AF1E-4CF7-91D9-7572E5BA3A46.jpeg B9110B90-1D3A-47AD-ACA1-B68EA326CFE8.jpeg 08B65AAC-2EDA-46D6-ADDE-9C2472AB7DCE.jpeg 2FC76191-5250-4D2D-8E3F-3E7DF2D510E5.jpeg I thought that I would post this, while I’m on hold with the suicide hotline....
    I have a total of 13 chickens, seven months old. Orpingtons and Wyandottes. I have six Wyandottes and one Orpingtons with mostly mild stages of Bumblefoot. None of them are limping; I posted a pic of the worst case.
    I’m thinking that it must be something that I did, so I’m also posting pics of the coop (8x8) and their run area (24x24). The run area used to be lush grass, but it now dirt and stones.
    ANY advice on treatment or changes to their environment are MOST appreciated!!!!
     
  2. ashlierami

    ashlierami Songster

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    To treat you need to remove the kernal from each. I wash the foot with warm water and soap. Then I use either needle nose tweezers or something to open the scab or remove it. Then you will squeeze. It will seem like nothing is going to come out but it should. You may even have to use a sterile blade to make the hold bigger. Sometimes you do have to dig around. The kernal will pop out. It will be hard and large. Once out peroxide or alcohol the site. Apply antibiotic ointment or poultry wound spray and wrap the foot. Do this daily or nightly or both depending how long the bandage stays on. Keep it wrapped for s few days until it scabs once again. Then just check it daily to make sure it's healing properly and spray it with a wound spray at night. Withing 7 to 10 days it should be healed. Maybe 14 depending on how bad it was
     
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  3. Vikinglike

    Vikinglike Songster

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    Thank you.
    A big question is, what is causing this? is there something that I need to change to prevent reoccurrence or the other girls from getting it?
    Thanks!!!
     
  4. ashlierami

    ashlierami Songster

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    From the pictures posted I didn't immediately notice anything wrong with your set up. Is there something they are cutting their foot pad on? Is there poop build up on the roosts? You mentioned their ground is dirt and stones . Maybe the Rocky terrain they have that was once grass? Maybe another user will chime in and have a better idea. My birds get it occasionally from going thru the Barb wire fence to get to the cow pasture. They sometimes prick their foot and then it makes an issue. I've never had 7 with it at once maybe one or 2 and I see it only occasionally.
     
    Vikinglike likes this.
  5. coach723

    coach723 Crowing

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    It's really hard to prevent it completely since any tiny cut, scrape or splinter can potentially become it if bacteria enters. A couple of thoughts. Roosts may be better turned the other way, wide side up. They can balance better on the wider surface. I also paint mine, makes them easier to clean and decreases splintering especially as the roosts age. And since the edges of your nest boxes appear to be just cut edges, maybe another source of splinters. Either painted or covered (maybe a section of hose sliced lengthwise and slipped over the edge- something they can't peck and eat). Basically, anything that can be done to minimize foot injuries and splinters should help, jumping too far can also contribute, but it won't ever be 100% no chance of a bird getting it.
    This is my preferred treatment:
    https://www.tillysnest.com/2015/12/non-surgical-bumblefoot-treatment.html/?spref=pi
    For smaller lesions this sometimes works, but it takes some time with soaking every day:
    https://ouroneacrefarm.com/2013/11/09/bumblefoot-treatment-tricideneo/
    I get it here:
    https://www.koiacres.com/tricide-neo.html
     
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  6. Vikinglike

    Vikinglike Songster

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    thanks. the roosts are clean. I used 4x4’s and occasionally run an electric planer over them.
    I was wondering if the issue is them nicking their feet on stones while scratching in the dirt?
     
  7. coach723

    coach723 Crowing

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    It could be, if you have lots of sharp stones. If your soil is very full of lots of sharp rocks then adding more soil or sand on top may help, but they are going to scratch and dig no matter what. In a covered run then shavings or other yard debris can help, but in an open area shavings would just become a wet moldy mess during the winter and spring, or any time it's wet. My outdoor run is large enough for the number of birds that I have that there is still plenty of grass left for them outside of their favorite dust bathing areas and high traffic spots (like the doorway).
     
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  8. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive Enabler

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    I have seen a lot of bumblefoot in my flock over the years. I used to think that each case required surgery to get the plug out, but after doing quite a few of those, I decided to limit it to those who limped or had an angry looking swollen red footpad. Some will have an abscess on top between toes as well. I stopped doing surgery, and though there are some with a scab on the footpad they do not seem to be surpffering.

    My soil around my coop and yard is old farm land with tiny sharp rocks that come to the surface every year during freezes. All it takes is a tiny cut or scratch, and it can happen. Look at you roost height, keep your floor padded, sweep away shard rocks, and look for extremely scratchy pine shavings. I bought some last year that was extremely prickly, and may have caused problems. Sand which I can get out of my surrounding creek, and which can be purchased from Home Depot, is a good soft material for coops and runs.
     
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  9. Akrnaf2

    Akrnaf2 The educated Rhino

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    Do they high roosting poles?
     

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