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HELP please! Injured chicken, ripped hip!

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by txageric, Jun 19, 2019.

  1. txageric

    txageric In the Brooder

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    I went out to find one of my young chickens (about 2-3 months old) has been seriously injured. I don’t know how. She was limping and when I took a closer look, I could see ripped open flesh around the hip area. She’s still walking though. I have a wound spray, but this is a deep wound. I want to make a sling or wrap or something to make her more comfortable, and I’m assuming antibiotics. I’ll try to go get a picture. Even if everyone says she’s not likely to make it, I want to at least make her as comfortable as possible. I’m dreading that someone will say to put her down.
     
  2. txageric

    txageric In the Brooder

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    506645C8-2F2D-49C1-9EDD-6D74FE29C8F1.jpeg D86A4048-7054-4816-AE14-6F03A606FB45.jpeg Ok we got a better look, and it’s not gaping or any ligaments or anything torn like I thought, thank God! Just skin torn off I think! Here are pictures.
     
  3. coach723

    coach723 Crowing

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    Clean it off well, chlorhexadine (hibiclens) or mild soapy water. Trim back any feathers that are getting in the wound to help keep it clean. You can use plain neosporin or triple antibiotic ointment on it (no pain killer). Keeping her on clean towels or puppy pads rather than loose bedding will also help keep it clean. Make sure she is not where flies can get to the wound. Veterycin spray is also good. As long as there is no infection she has a very good chance to heal up. This article has pictures, may help you know what to expect for healing: http://richie-cunningham.com/2012/04/11/chicken-wound-healing-process/
    Do you have a rooster? That is an area that could have been wounded by rooster spurs/claws.
     
    Wyorp Rock and Eggcessive like this.
  4. txageric

    txageric In the Brooder

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    Thank you so much! That’s very helpful. Yes, we do have a rooster, and he’s a mean one. I’ve never seen him be mean to another chicken, but he is mean to us. I wish I knew if it were the rooster or not. I plan to follow this advice and hope she heals nicely! Thanks again!
     
  5. Kathy Golla

    Kathy Golla Songster

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    You can trim your roosters spurs and claws.
     
    coach723 likes this.
  6. txageric

    txageric In the Brooder

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    Oh great idea Kathy! I didn’t know that. I suppose I can look up online how to do it. Every time we go out with the chickens, the kids and I have to walk around with a net or broom so he won’t come after us. He doesn’t come after my husband... just the women and children.
    I really don’t think it was him because I’ve never seen him go after another chicken. He seems to protect them, and that’s the reason he goes after us... he’s trying to keep us away from the flock, I guess. You would think after years of babying them, and hand-feeding them treats, and taking care of them, he would understand we are not the enemy though.
    It’s definitely a good idea to trim his spurs and claws though, for our safety, and the other chickens, just in case he is the culprit or ever decides to be.
     
  7. coach723

    coach723 Crowing

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    He may not have intended to hurt the hen. It just happens in the mounting process. Sharp spurs and claws can inadvertently cause injury while he's hanging on, if she moves or he slips. This link explains the common ways of trimming:
    https://www.hobbyfarms.com/rooster-spurs-removing/
    You can also find video's on line.
    As for his aggressiveness to you and your children, that's another issue. I don't keep roo's that go after people, makes chicken chores no fun. It could be dangerous for a child. Too many good roosters out there to put up with a rotten one, but that is your choice. Some people have methods in which they try to change roosters attitudes, you can search for those, he needs to respect you, not love you. In my experience friendly cockerel chicks often grow up to be aggressive, those that are more stand-offish and get out of your way have tended to make better roo's. Entirely a personal decision for you what to do with him, in my flock he would be soup. I have two roo's right now, neither one of them has ever attacked a human being. I have had some rotten ones, they don't stay long.
     
    Kathy Golla likes this.
  8. Kathy Golla

    Kathy Golla Songster

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    Yes Coach723 taught me that.
     
  9. txageric

    txageric In the Brooder

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  10. txageric

    txageric In the Brooder

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    Thank you! I am definitely going to look at the information and trim him. Don’t want this happening again to any others. Good to think maybe he didn’t do it on purpose.

    Strangely, my kids kind of love this little bantam rooster (from a distance). We raised him from a baby. He’s my oldest daughter’s and we got him around Easter a couple years ago. They would actually be really horrified to get rid of him (in that way especially). They are always giggling about him because he’s so little, but so cocky. We always say, “we love you, Peep. We just don’t like you... or want to be around you.” They think that’s funny.
    Even giving him away to a place that doesn’t have kids would be really hard. But I’d rather do that if I had to get rid of him somehow. There’s no way even my husband could get rid of him the other way. He’s a jerk, but he’s our jerk!

    The chickens are all in a huge enclosed yard connected to their barn. It’s even enclosed with a net at the top because we had a hawk problem. So Peep can’t get to us unless we let them out. We let them out for a couple hours each evening to free range, and at that point we just don’t go outside, or if we do, the kids don’t go outside without an adult walking with them with protection. We keep the broom by the back door, an umbrella by the front door, and the net by their barn door for if I have to go in the barn when my husband isn’t there. We have a system. The kids are not allowed to go outside without permission anyway, whether he’s out or not.

    As far as him loving us... I know, we definitely don’t expect that from him ... or any chicken. But somehow we just love them anyway. Crazy chicken people! I’ve thought about that a lot as I’m spending time with them, or just watching them. They don’t offer much affection, but I can’t help loving them even if they can’t return it.

    I’ve read posts and links on here on ways to get respect from a rooster. I’ll have to read it again. I don’t remember.

    But now knowing we can trim those claws and spurs is fabulous news! Also it’s really good to know there are good roosters out there!
     
    Last edited: Jun 20, 2019

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