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Help please, my chickens are sick, nothing is working

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by ashelt, Sep 11, 2012.

  1. ashelt

    ashelt Out Of The Brooder

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    I have had 2 white hens since birth (I am a new chicken owner) they are now 12 weeks old. 2 weeks ago we went to a persons house that sold chickens and bought 12 more, =2 polish, 2 rhode island, 2barred rock, 3 legbar (i think), 2 ameraucana, and 1 welsummer all hens all under 20 weeks old. Within the week I noticed my one white leghorn gurgling a little. I read on the internet that they can make a purring sound, so i let it go a few days, she still made the sound so I went to the feed store and they gave me Duramycin 10, add 1 tablespoon to gallon of water daily (fresh batch everyday). The next week we went to another farm (more respectable-the lady works at a feed store-had a real farm) and bought 1 welsummer rooster about 11 months old, 3 silkies bantams born in may, a qual belgian bearded danver hen-bantam -not sure how old she is, but young.
    Since last weekend, now both white leghorns., my little quail, my large barred rock, 1 Ameraucana are sick, sneezing or coughing, runny nose, gurgling sounds in throat, shaking head like to clear themselves, seem sleepy during the day, diahrea and their breath will knock you out. Also 1 of my barred rocks my little one had-had a runny eye, it is gone but the area under that eye is swollen. They are still on Duramycin 10, and also have them on a electrolyte that Tractor Supply gave me for them at 2 1/4 teaspoon added to the same gallon of water. Today, I called my lady back at the feed story, she said bring 1 leghorn in and she would sell me tylan 50 to inject in all my sick hens. She showed me how, she injected it in her left shoulder area at 1/2 cc and told me to inject the other sick hens alsobut only once. She told me to give the qual and bantam 1/4cc. I read to inject them for several days???What do you think? Am I doing the right thing? Are there shots I can give them all later so that this wont happen again if it is Mycoplasma or CRD, corzya, or whatever.
    AND if they live will they always be carriers and with that I cannot ever buy anymore chickensor eat their eggs???
    UPDATE-TODAY now my black silkie sounds terrible, gurgline while breathing in and out, and sneezing like every 15 breaths, sleepy. I couldnt smell her breath -couldnt catch her, she is fast! My other sick birds still sound and act the same....
    I am really upset with myself for not being more careful I guess with the first batch I purchased.
    BTW, my pen and coop are brand new, very clean, concidering they are messy, I wash their water thing, etc...

    Please If anyone can give me some advice, they are also our pets, and well I love them.....

    UPDATE-Now my new little qual chicken who doesnt feel good, even though she isnt as bad off as the others that are sick, literaly is coming up to me to hold her, she nessles into my lap and seems to be sleeping, she has always been friendly but never this loving, she seems to be last in the pecking order, but now she just wants to be held. Trying to find a chicken vet, not finding anything yet, put in a few calls, waiting.... my poor babies, I am so worried.
     
    Last edited: Sep 11, 2012
  2. thebanthams

    thebanthams Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Im not sure whats wrong, but sounds like a virus . so sorry you have to go through this !
     
  3. Suzie

    Suzie Overrun With Chickens

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    If it is Coryza you will notice a foul smell - it is so distinctive. Try treating your flock with an antibiotic such as tetratime or a tetracycline / baytril.

    I wish you well - it is awful to see your flock so ill.

    Suzie
     
  4. soler

    soler Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Can you call the place you got the 12 chickens from and ask what disease outbreaks they have had? They might lie, but maybe if you stress that you don't want your money back you just want to save the chickens, they might tell you what it is or how they treat them??

    i think the tylan 50 is a good idea meanwhile, i would research more on dosage. if one chicken dies, the very best thing to do is to immediately bring the body to a vet for an autopsy, so you will know exactly what you are dealing with.

    I believe there is no issue with the eggs (but double check that), but you can't eat them for a certain time after giving antibiotics. usually that is 14 days, but check specific times for what you are using. If they have newcastle disease that can be infectious to people.

    Also, note you can vaccinate future additions for coryza, but you need to isolate them first. You should always quarantine and isolate new additions, but i am sure you have gathered that by now!

    here is what i found on coryza:
    Swelling around the face, foul smelling, thick, sticky discharge from the nostrils and eyes, labored breathing, and rales (rattles -- an abnormal breathing sound) are common clinical signs. The eyelids are irritated and may stick together. The birds may have diarrhea and growing birds may become stunted (see Table 1).
    Mortality from coryza is usually low, but infections can decrease egg production and increase the incidence and/or severity of other diseases. Mortality can be as high as 50 percent, but is usually no more than 20 percent. The clinical disease can last from a few days to 2-3 months, depending on the virulence of the pathogen and the existence of other infections such as mycoplasmosis.


    Water soluble antibiotics or antibacterials can be used. Sulfadimethoxine (Albon®, Di- MethoxTM) is the preferred treatment. If it is not available, or not effective, sulfamethazine (Sulfa-Max®, SulfaSureTM), erythromycin (gallimycin®), or tetracycline (Aureomycin®) can be used as alternative treatments. Sulfa drugs are not FDA approved for pullets older than 14 weeks of age or for commercial layer hens. While antibiotics can be effective in reduc- ing clinical disease, they do not eliminate carrier birds.

    on laryngotracheitis - this one is really bad
    he clinical sign usually first noticed is watery eyes. Affected birds remain quiet because breathing is difficult. Coughing, sneezing, and shaking of the head to dislodge exudate plugs in the windpipe follow. Birds extend their head and neck to facilitate breathing (commonly referred to as “pump handle respiration”). Inhalation produces a wheezing and gurgling sound. Blood-tinged exudates and serum clots are expelled from the trachea of affected birds. Many birds die from asphyxiation due to a blockage of the trachea when the tracheal plug is freed (see Table 1).
    Incinerate dead birds, administer antibiotics to control secondary infection, and vaccinate the flock. Mass vaccination by spray or drinking water method is not recommended for large commercial or caged flocks. Individual bird administration by the eye-drop route
    is suggested. Follow manufacturers instructions. In small poultry flocks, use a swab to remove plug from gasping birds, and vaccinate by eye-drop method.
    Vaccinate replacement birds for outbreak farms. Vaccination for LT is not as successful as for other disease, but is an excellent preventive measure for use in outbreaks and in epidemic areas. Refer to the publication PS-36 (Vaccination of Small Poultry Flocks) for more information on LT vaccinations.


    influenza:
    Avian influenza is categorized as mild or highly pathogenic. The mild form produces listlessness, loss of appetite, respiratory distress, diarrhea, transient drops in egg produc- tion, and low mortality. The highly pathogenic form produces facial swelling, blue comb and wattles, and dehydration with respiratory distress. Dark red/white spots develop in the legs and combs of chickens. There can be blood-tinged discharge from the nostrils. Mortality can range from low to near 100 percent. Sudden exertion adds to the total mortality. Egg production and hatchability decreases. There can be an increase in production of soft-shelled and shell-less eggs (see Table 1).


    A vaccination program used in conjunction with a strict quarantine has been used to control mild forms of the disease. With the more lethal forms, strict quarantine and rapid destruction of all infected flocks remains the only effective method of stopping an avian influenza outbreak. If you suspect you may have Avian Influenza in your flock, even the mild form, you must report it to the state veterinarian’s office. A proper diagnosis of avian influenza is essential. Aggressive action is recommended even for milder infections as this virus has the ability to readily mutate to a more pathogenic form.


    infectious bronchitis
    The severity of infectious bronchitis infection is influenced by the age and immune status of the flock, by environmental conditions, and by the presence of other diseases. Feed and water consumption declines. Affected chickens will be chirping, with a watery discharge from the eyes and nostrils, and labored breathing with some gasping in young chickens. Breathing noises are more noticeable at night while the birds rest. Egg production drops dramatically. Production will recover in 5 or 6 weeks, but at a lower rate. The infectious bronchitis virus infects many tissues of the body, including the reproductive tract

    here is no specific treatment for infectious bronchitis. Antibiotics for 3-5 days may aid in combating secondary bacterial infections. Raise the room temperature 5°F for brooding- age chickens until symptoms subside. Baby chicks can be encouraged to eat by using a warm, moist mash.

    new castle disease
    here are three forms of Newcastle disease -- mildly pathogenic (lentogenic), moderately pathogenic (mesogenic) and highly pathogenic (velogenic). Newcastle disease is charac- terized by a sudden onset of clinical signs which include hoarse chirps (in chicks), watery discharge from nostrils, labored breathing (gasping), facial swelling, paralysis, trembling, and twisting of the neck (sign of central nervous system involvement). Mortality ranges from 10 to 80 percent depending on the pathogenicity. In adult laying birds, symptoms can include decreased feed and water consumption and a dramatic drop in egg production (see Table 1).

    There is no specific treatment for Newcastle disease. Antibiotics can be given for 3-5 days to prevent secondary bacterial infections (particularly E. coli ). For chicks, increasing the brooding temperature 5°F may help reduce losses.
    Prevention programs should include vaccination (see publication PS-36, Vaccination of Small Poultry Flocks), good sanitation, and implementation of a comprehensive biosecu- rity program.
     
  5. ashelt

    ashelt Out Of The Brooder

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    I did call the people I first purchased from, they said their chickens werent sick... Finally found a chicken vet--avian, appointment tomo, bringing 2 -hopefully all of them will be saved. Cross my fingers!
     
  6. soler

    soler Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Best of luck. Please let us know what happens!!
     
  7. ashelt

    ashelt Out Of The Brooder

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    OK, went to vet---avain vet. They have mycoplasma gallisepticum. I took the 5 that were sick, he gave them a shot each of Draxxin 100mg/ml 0.01-0.9. That is what my receipt says. Having me put the rest of my flock on Tylan 100GM, 1 tsp per gallon of water daily for 5-7 days. He also suggested a deworming incase, to use Safeguard and to mix it with their food every day for 3 day. So, hopefully everything will be alright, and my girls will get better! I just wanted to put this info out there if it can help anyone else. Cost me $149, but it was worth it!
     
  8. soler

    soler Chillin' With My Peeps

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    that is great info, actually. I would also love to know how it turns out if you can post back in a few days.
     
  9. ashelt

    ashelt Out Of The Brooder

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    definately, I will post on how they are doing... Now I am looking to see which powder safeguard dewormer to use, for dogs, goats, beef? Nothing is ever ease.....lol Anyone know?
     
  10. NovaAman

    NovaAman Overrun With Chickens

    Oh lordy... that is awful!

    You are going to get a lot of mixed reactions from other BYC members on the condition of your birds. There will be a lot who will say to cull, and a lot who will say good luck... This is a highly infectious disease... It is something that is carried by wild birds as well.

    You will need to keep a closed flock if you chose to keep your birds. They may never have another outbreak, but they just might. You will always need to keep tylan on hand, and start treatments as soon as any of the systemic symptoms appear. Birds you bring into the flock will more than likely become infected. You can not sell or trade any of your birds. You do not want to spread this to other farms.

    If you decide to cull, you will need to wait until after at least 2 weeks have passed before putting new birds in the coop. A good sanitizing would also be recommended.

    There are quite a lot of flocks that are MG positive. A lot of people never even know that their flocks have it, so it may be that the people you got your birds from do not know it. It may be that the move from their flock to your house was just enough stress to cause the symptoms to appear. This may be the only time you ever see these symptoms, but your birds will forever be carriers.

    One thing you can do to help contain the disease is to always go to the feed store in clean clothes and shoes that you do not where into the chicken yard. Do not handle other peoples chickens and then handle your own and vice versa with out having showered and changing your clothing in between. I know... Sounds crazy, but you know how you feel right now about your birds being ill and the people you got them from probably sold them to you knowing that there was an illness in their flock, but are not going to say anything... Be the bigger person, and don't do this to someone else. You can hatch out your own chicks instead of buy new birds, this will keep your flock closed. If you do bring in new birds, again, be aware that they will be infected.

    You can cull and eat the birds. They will not get you sick in any way. The eggs are fine too, after the medication period is over, I think 2 weeks after the last dose of medication. If you can not look at your birds and see a meal, but still decide to cull, I would say bury deep, or even cremate.

    In the end this is your choice on how to proceed. You may get crap from both camps, the "cull" camp, and the "keep" camp. Just educate yourself on MG so you will know the first signs of an flare up. This is not curable, but it is treatable.
     

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