Help please

Discussion in 'Quail' started by katiekarl, Nov 10, 2013.

  1. katiekarl

    katiekarl Out Of The Brooder

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    Sep 9, 2013
    Barnsley
    Hi, iv got 30 quails that was kept in mesh cages for about 3 months with plenty of light and was getting at least 2 dozen eggs a day but they seemed over crowded and kept catching there nails, so 3 days ago I had a new pen built for them double the size they was in before and I have put down sawdust which they seemed to love but I only got half a dozen eggs yesterday and 3 today what have I done wrong? Is sawdust no good? Any help much appreciated many thanks [​IMG]
     
  2. katiekarl

    katiekarl Out Of The Brooder

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    Sep 9, 2013
    Barnsley
    This is only 1/4 of the pen shown
     
  3. AK Baha

    AK Baha Chillin' With My Peeps

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    They may be a little traumatized by the move. They should get back to normal soon.
     
  4. katiekarl

    katiekarl Out Of The Brooder

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    Sep 9, 2013
    Barnsley
    Somebody told me they don't lay as well on sawdust is this true would you reconnect sand or grit?
     
  5. katiekarl

    katiekarl Out Of The Brooder

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    Sep 9, 2013
    Barnsley
    *recommend, no re connect sorry
     
  6. AK Baha

    AK Baha Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Anchorage, Alaska.
    Have never raised quail before. I would think that sawdust would be just fine.
     
  7. TwoCrows

    TwoCrows Show me the way old friend... Staff Member

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    The sawdust has nothing to do with anything. A hen will lay when her hormones tell her, there is enough light and warmth, she is getting enough protein, she is healthy enough and is not stressed. So you need to address all of these if you want eggs this time of year.

    If you are now going into winter, their bodies tell them to stop laying. So extra light, (13-14 hours a day, regular daylight with added artificial light) and heat if it is getting much below freezing. The hens need to be on a high protein diet of at least 24% to continue laying, along with crushed oyster shell on the side for a hard shell. They also need to be healthy, wormed if they need it and not ill in any way. If they are too crowded in, or there is a lot of human traffic, dog traffic, kid traffic, or predators lurking at night, this can stress hens and they won't lay.

    Give each hen at least 2 square feet per bird. Add hidey places to either lay their eggs or get away from each other (over turned flower pots, wooden boxes, etc..) and put some real or artificial foliage to create a brush pile effect so that they feel protected and more natural. This will relax the hens and help them be more comfortable laying more eggs.

    If you have moved them to a completely new area, they will also need time to adjust. Shouldn't take too long and will happen faster if you address the above concerns.
     
    Last edited: Nov 10, 2013
  8. katiekarl

    katiekarl Out Of The Brooder

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    Sep 9, 2013
    Barnsley
    Thankyou so much for your advice no there in the same out building just different cage they have a strip light on all day too alongside natural light, but the cage was being built in the out building whilst the hens was in do I guess all the noise etc and the move may have unsettled them, thankyou
     
  9. katiekarl

    katiekarl Out Of The Brooder

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    Sep 9, 2013
    Barnsley
    Stil no eggs have tried everything,
     
  10. TwoCrows

    TwoCrows Show me the way old friend... Staff Member

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    If these birds are all healthy, have plenty of space per bird, feel secure, and if you have males...the male to hen ratio is right, they are not stressed in anyway, they are on a high protein diet, and if needed you have added extra light and heat, they should be laying. One of these things is most likely out of balance.
     

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