HELP! Pullet's skull is exposed

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by Wyatt0224, Feb 2, 2017.

  1. Wyatt0224

    Wyatt0224 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    This is my new Delaware pullet. This was done to her by my older hens. She is separated now. Please tell me what I can do to help her and save her.
     
  2. QuackSpeak

    QuackSpeak Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I'm so sorry! I really wish I could help more, but I have no experience with injured chickens... I would make sure she's warm, comfortable, has food and water, but I probably haven't told you anything you don't already know. Maybe try to clean the wound out?
     
  3. ShannonMC

    ShannonMC Out Of The Brooder

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    We had a hen with her breast and neck ripped open by possums this past fall. She made it just fine, and we didn't do anything special for her. She is tough! I don't know about head injuries but I think chickens are pretty resiliant anyway. The best you can do is wash and treat it like a normal wound and keep her safe and separated. Just make sure she keeps drinking water. I wouldn't worry about lack of interest in food as much as making sure she is hydrated.
     
  4. Firekin1

    Firekin1 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Keep her separate, keep the wound clean and dry to help prevent infection, and give her some electrolytes in her water as an added boost.
     
    Last edited: Feb 2, 2017
  5. Wyatt0224

    Wyatt0224 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Should I use a wet wash cloth to wipe off the blood? And use any chemicals to make sure it prevents infection?
     
  6. Firekin1

    Firekin1 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    That's what I used, wet cloth to gently clean and then I used plain polysporin (or any antiseptic or antibacterial ointment or spray would work like blue kote or bactine without pain reliever) chickens are pretty resilient,as long as she isn't overly stressed and her wound doesn't get infected she should be totally healed in a few weeks. I had a young cockerel get scalped when he was 9 weeks old and he healed up great
     
  7. Wyatt0224

    Wyatt0224 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Would neosporin work?
     
  8. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive True BYC Addict

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    Plain neosporin, bacitracin, triple antibiotic or polysorin are all similar and okay to use after cleaning a wound. Saline to wash the wounds or a solution of chlorhexidene or betadine are all useful to clean the wound. Most of these type wounds will usually heal with feather regrowth in a few weeks. Separate her in a dog crate within the coop so that she cannot be hurt, and give her her own water. If she seems in shock, you could bring her inside to a dim quiet area overnight. When she has started healing, get some BluKote an antiseptic blue spray that will hide her wounds. Then slowly reintegrate her back into the flock. She must be near them and in the cage to let them get used to her, as well as similar in size.
     
  9. Wyatt0224

    Wyatt0224 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    She has been separated overnight in a plastic bin in a shed with a thick layer of straw to keep her warm. She has her own food and water. First thing tomorrow morning I'll be out there to clean it and put neosporin on it.
     
  10. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive True BYC Addict

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    That is great. Is she able to stand and walk around? She may be in shock for a time, and keeping her warm and quiet would be best. Getting her to drink some fluids with electrolytes is more important than food at first. Then offer her some bits of egg and her usual feed. I still would get a crate or dog cage where she could see and smell the others, and hang out for a week or two healing. Then she would be partially integrated, but it doesn't have to be rushed. After that she could have some supervised free ranging with the rest of the flock. Hopefully, then she will only suffer a peck or two, and not attacked. It is sometimes easier to add more than one to a flock of big girls. Hopefully she will heal up soon.
     
    Last edited: Feb 2, 2017

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