Help request! Possible adoption what to look for?

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by NHMountainMan, Jul 23, 2019.

  1. NHMountainMan

    NHMountainMan Songster

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    I've been looking to add a cockerell to my 13 pullet flock. I've found an available one in a nearby town that's about the same age (14 weeks).
    I wanted to see him and their entire flock to see if I want to take him. I'm prepared to quarantine for a month, but want to reduce the risk as much as possible.
    Looking for advice as to what to ask, and what to look for in their coop and flock.

    Thanks in advance for the advice
     
  2. Mvan42

    Mvan42 Songster

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    Healthy looking flock, clean environment including their run/coop area(as clean as it can be after all they are chickens). Clean water. I would look for any is signs of sickness. Happy well taken care of flock. I am sure you will know at first look. ​
     
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  3. DobieLover

    DobieLover Easily distracted by chickens

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    I agree with the above. In addition, look him over carefully for body parasites, bright clear eyes, no nasal discharge and inspect his feet and legs for SLM and bumble foot.

    On a side note... I highly recommend you get a much older bird. Get an actual rooster if you can, preferably one that has been raised with older hens/roosters and one that has already gone through preferably 2 springs and has settled down into his true personality. Cockerels are hormonally charged little beasts and the guy you are going to look at may become very aggressive with his new flock of pullets and when the hormones really unleash. Good luck.

    Having a rooster in your flock changes the dynamics. I personally really enjoy mine. Even though he doesn't particularly like me at the moment.
     
  4. NHMountainMan

    NHMountainMan Songster

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    Thank you for the great advice!
     
  5. ocap

    ocap Crowing

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    I have a tendency to mentally buy before I see. This causes me to accept less than the best. I must change and be ready to walk away from any and every purchase if I see any thing that makes me uneasy.
     
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  6. NHMountainMan

    NHMountainMan Songster

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    Thank you so much for your advice!
    This is my first time raising chickens. I read so much conflicting info. I'd read so much conflicting info on cockerell / roosters. I've read an older bird might harass the pullets by trying to mate before they are mature enough.
    I'm basically looking for a loud roo that can alert me to predator risk so I can let my dogs out. Not looking to raise chicks of my own.
    The present owner tells me that the cockerell I'm looking at is the top dog in his flock (5 cockerells and 35 pullets) but is too loud for his neighbors. As I have no nearby neighbors, that's not an issue for me.

    Is their anything behavioral I should look at before deciding or should I just pass on the cockerell and look for an experienced roo?

    Thank you again!
     
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  7. ocap

    ocap Crowing

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    A cockerel that is crowing is a great bird to consider. He has the hormones and dominance to be great bird. Watch him interact with people to see if he wants to flog a human.
     
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  8. DobieLover

    DobieLover Easily distracted by chickens

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    Highly dominant cockerels can be quite the handful.
    I'll just tell you my story and you can draw from it or not...
    I had 2 cockerels that were basically tag teaming my pullets. It was a nightmare of them.
    I rehomed the nicer of the two and kept the Salmon Faverolles as they are supposed to generally become nicer roosters. He was okay but no cuddle bug. But he did all the things as a cockerel that I wanted in a rooster: tid bitted and actually gave the goodies to his girls, he is constantly watching out for predators and alerts frequently, he is generally gentle with the girls (some morning his hormones run away with his brain) and he was not aggressive with me.
    When I began construction on the new coop and run in their pen, he began to attack me daily. I've been flogged too many times to count. He doesn't bother my DH a bit.
    Now that construction has stopped, so have the attacks.
    Just something to consider. You have to change your behavior when you have a male in the flock. I'm not at all saying not to consider adding one. I would just highly recommend a mature bird. A mature bird is FAR LESS likely to "attack" your pullets to breed them. Quite the contrary, he will more than likely court them and win them over and will be much more skilled at mating them without injuring them.
     
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  9. NHMountainMan

    NHMountainMan Songster

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    It's always tough to say no. For a long time, I had to make big financial decisions for my career, and it was easy to be wise and frugal. It took me a long time to adopt that in my personal life. It was a hard lesson to learn to be discerning , instead of impulsive. Though I have to admit - impulsive led me to meet my wife - and that worked out for me!
     
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  10. NHMountainMan

    NHMountainMan Songster

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    I really appreciate the advice.I'm still planning on going to see the cockerel, but I think you've convinced me to pass. Can I ask - if this cockerel is calm, gentle with his own flock, and fine with me as I meet him - is that behavior something that would indicate he'd be fine with my birds? Or would his personality change once he become the only male with his own harem? Thank you so much for the advice - really helpful for a newbie like me.
     
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