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Help!! Rooster has Sprained/Broken his Leg!!

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by Colton, Jul 11, 2013.

  1. Colton

    Colton Chillin' With My Peeps

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    My RIR rooster, my favorite chicken of my 40 some chickens, has sprained or broken his leg. It started yesterday and he was limping. It is his right leg. He still hobbles around and eats and drinks very well. But looks like his leg is slowing him down. He doesn't put much weight on it and I don't know what to do. This same thing happened to him last year and I kind of forgot all the things I did. Anything on the subject would be greatly appreciated.

    Thanks, Colton
     
  2. chooks4life

    chooks4life Overrun With Chickens

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    If he can put weight on it at all, it's a fracture or a sprain. If he can't, it's a break.

    If he can get around, the key would be to make sure he doesn't overexercise himself. If he's struggling to keep up with the hens, I would cage them or at least some with him for a day or two or however long it takes for him to show improvement.

    If it's a break, splints are only daunting in appearance, in practice they are simple and easy. But it sounds like a fracture or sprain which just needs resting up.

    It's a little strange you could have gone through that last year and not remember what you did to fix it. One of my brothers, though young, has a bad memory and we've had to treat that. Hopefully without offending I would recommend you do some memory exercises and take some memory supporting supplements, like basically anything that decreases inflammation and improves circulation and nutrition, which encompasses the spectrum of herbs from cinnamon to cayenne, gotu kola, chai, gingko biloba or kelp, or anything you choose to support your memory, because if you let memory loss accelerate it will often become early senile dementia or alzheimer's.

    Anything rich in omegas will support your brain in all its functions including memory, so fish or nettle or coconut oil and lots of things can help you there too. Another interesting function of cinnamon is that it can cure diabetes. It'll take the commercial medical establishment years to admit that but it is proven in trials and personally we also have diabetes in the family and have cured it by adding cinnamon to our diet.

    Having some family members including my brother with memory issues means I tend to my own brain as well as researching stuff to help them. Short term memory loss often accelerates into general amnesia if left. When I'm forgetting stuff too often, I get proactive about it, both in exercises and diet, and since making a few permanent lifestyle changes have not had memory issues.

    Best wishes for you and yours.
     
  3. Colton

    Colton Chillin' With My Peeps

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    thanks for all the help, but I'm 14
     
  4. ten chicks

    ten chicks Chillin' With My Peeps

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    He may have just injured his leg. Look at the bottom of his foot,you are looking for a bump/sore on his foot,there is a condition call bumblefoot,it is an infection. If possible,put him in a crate/cage so that he can heal,and you can monitor him. If he will let you,you can soak his leg in a epsom salt soak(for about 15-20 min)this is good for sprains/muscle damage.Your mom or dad will probably know what epsom salts are.
     
  5. aseelpak

    aseelpak Out Of The Brooder

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    good luck........................he will be fine , if he is walking and no bumps or mole on his foot than i think he will be fine
     
  6. chooks4life

    chooks4life Overrun With Chickens

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    Quote: My little brother was younger than you when he started experiencing severe memory loss.

    Age is no guarantee of anything. Any memory loss should be taken as a potential warning of more to come.
     
  7. AQHAchick22

    AQHAchick22 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:You're just a bucket full of sunshine...I don't know if you should be telling a 14 year old they should be worried about their memory...
     
  8. appps

    appps Overrun With Chickens

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    Yeah ditto the poster above, forgetting exactly what you did for a one off injury a year ago when you are 14 is perfectly normal.

    How is your rooster doing?
     
    Last edited: Jul 17, 2013
  9. chooks4life

    chooks4life Overrun With Chickens

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    No, you don't know, but I do, from personal experience. I'm a bucket full of reality, actually. The truth is often harsh.

    Yes, and as I've said, what's normal these days is not healthy. Cancer's normal too. Reality is painful. Hiding from it is more painful and allows more damage to occur than if we try to prevent it. Forgetting what you did a year ago is not normal unless you're 90. Oh, that's right, these days we expect and accept people lose their memories at 50. What's that called? Early onset dementia is one thing it's diagnosed as. Why do they call it early? Because it's not normal. What are the warning signs? Memory loss at a young age is a strong one. Fancy that? No? Then take steps to prevent it.

    Notice that I didn't just say it's something to watch, I also told them some treatments my brother used which helped him. People accept all sorts of warning signs as being normal, as being representative of their health or their animal's health, and these sorts suffer unnecessarily and so do their animals.
     
  10. SAN D I SEZ

    SAN D I SEZ New Egg

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    I think it's best not to advise a minor about heath issues, If he took your advise and had adverse effects it could be a legal issue for ya! Let his parents take care of that and lets move on~~~ My Rooster also is limping hes eating good and drinking fine I know that he is haveing some stress or pain because his comb is not a bright as it usually is~~~~ kinda pink! I have him sitting on my dining room table in a makeshift kennel ( my laundry hamper) great for nesting boxes and if ya have to travel or bring them in for bad weather situations =) I give him a li aspirin in water and keep him quiet on a clean soft towel ~~ he has his grain a few grapes wich he likes and a water bottle to peck at for water!! I am hoping in a few days he will be ready to return to his ladies..... but he hasn't been crowing!!! ~~~ I took him outside for a few minutes and he saw his girls and he did crow but not since I brought him back in!! do you think what i am doing is ok? or do the girls need him out there for direction or warning? i would hate for something to happen to them because i took him in and left them without warning! any feedback on this question would be appreciated!
     

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