Help Rooster Problem

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by Imonrroy, Oct 2, 2013.

  1. Imonrroy

    Imonrroy New Egg

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    Oct 2, 2013
    Needville, TX
    I purchased an ameraucana young rooster about 2weeks ago and he was severly malnurished and underweight. I have been giving him electrolytes in his water and he has been drinking and eating regularly. However he still has been pooping very watery and he hasn't gained any weight. What can I do to stop his watery poop and put some weight on him? Also my female hens keep pecking at him and chasing him constantly, but I'm guessing its because he wasn't raised with them and hes an outsider to them.
     
  2. enola

    enola Overrun With Chickens

    He needs to be isolated from your hens stress is not good in his present state of health. You need to treat him for coccidia and then worm him.
     
  3. cafarmgirl

    cafarmgirl Overrun With Chickens

    Good advice. New birds should always be quarantined a minimum of thirty days before letting them mix with your current birds. Hopefully he has not brought anything worse to your flock then worms or cocci. And yes, they will peck him because he is new. After new birds are out of quarantine it's best to fence off an area for them next to the other birds for a couple weeks so they all have some time to get used to each other before they are allowed out together.

    I would do exactly as Enola suggested, run a course of Corid and then deworm him, make sure you repeat the deworming in 10 days. Also, because he is new to your flock and has shared space with them you also need to watch them closely. He could bring along a strain of cocci that they are not immune too. Also, when you deworm him it would be best to deworm all of them since, if he is wormy, they'll pick it up too.
     
    Last edited: Oct 2, 2013
  4. BantamLover21

    BantamLover21 Overrun With Chickens

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    I would isolate your rooster from your hens. Continue putting some vitamins/electrolytes in his water, and encourage him to eat as much as possible. Some good foods to get him to eat are moistened feed, scrambled or hard boiled eggs, mealworms, wet cat food, and bread. He needs to start gaining weight.

    I would also recommend worming him with a broad-spectrum wormer. Some choices include Valbazen, SafeGuard, and the Worminator (Flubenvet). Don't use Wazine or Ivermectin, as Wazine only works on roundworms, and many worms are resistant to Ivermectin. Most wormers can usually be found at a livestock supply store, and the Worminator can be ordered online from here: http://www.twincitypoultrysupplies.com/store/index.php?main_page=product_info&products_id=584

    You might also consider treating him for Coccidiosis. Get some Corid 9.6% liquid or 20% powder; the dosage is 2 teaspoons/gal. for the liquid and 3/4 teaspoon/gal. for the powder. Treat for 5-7 days, and do not put vitamins in the water during treatment, as they will interfere.
     
    Last edited: Oct 2, 2013
  5. Wyandottes7

    Wyandottes7 Overrun With Chickens

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    X2. It sounds like he might have worms, so worming is definitely a good idea.
     
  6. Imonrroy

    Imonrroy New Egg

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    Oct 2, 2013
    Needville, TX
    He is isolated physicaly in a dog kennel and has is own feed and water. I haven't seen any worms in his poop so is it still ok to worm him anyway?
     
  7. enola

    enola Overrun With Chickens

    Treating him for worms and coccidia would be your best bet. You won't necessarily see worms in his poop. I isolate ALL new chickens treat them for worms, coccidia and external parasites BEFORE putting them with the rest of my chickens.
     

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