Help sexing 5 new chicks!

Discussion in 'Raising Baby Chicks' started by lmilano, Jun 22, 2016.

  1. lmilano

    lmilano New Egg

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    Feb 14, 2016
    I have a friends who's little boy was finishing up Kindergarten and his class incubated some eggs. Unfortunately the chicks had no where to go at the end of school and my hubby said we could adopt them. I am almost positive that we only have 1 roo but would love other people's opinions. Thanks!!

    Chick 1 - We definitely think its a roo
    [​IMG]

    Chick 2 - We think this is a pullet
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]


    Chick 3 - Hubby swears its a pullet
    [​IMG]

    Chick 4 - Again hubby thinks pullet
    [​IMG]

    Chick 5 - Another pullet?
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    Appreciate the help :)
     
  2. Alexandra33

    Alexandra33 Chillin' With My Peeps

    Pretty early to tell at this point. [​IMG] How about in a few weeks?

    ~Alex
     
  3. lazy gardener

    lazy gardener Flock Master

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    It would be helpful to know where the eggs come from. Types of hens in the flock, breed and coloring of the rooster. Can you show the back of heads of the black ones? If I was to take a wild guess, I'd say all the black ones are roos.
     
  4. Ridgerunner

    Ridgerunner True BYC Addict

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    How old are they? Since they are still in down I’d think just a few days. It’s really hard to sex most chicks by appearance until they are about 5 weeks old. Even then you can be really unsure with some for much longer. Occasionally you get some that are so obvious that you can tell straight from hatch, especially the males, but not so for the vast majority. Further to LG’s question on the parents, sometimes if you know the color and breed of the parents and which parent is what color, you can tell sex by down color or pattern.

    I’ll include a link to a thread that gives some pretty good details of what to look for in trying to sex chicks.

    https://www.backyardchickens.com/t/48329/secondary-sex-characteristics

    The main clues for me early on are the legs, general posture, and body build. Males typically have heavier legs and a more upright posture. Body build is hard to explain in words, I think that comes more with experience, but more chest typically trends to males. You can read that thread and see all the characteristics they talk about kicking in about 5 weeks. For me that’s often when comb and wattles become really helpful, but chicks with a single comb are often easier that those with other comb types at this age. If you know breed/color some differences in what colors come in where can really help when they feather out.

    It’s usually months and not weeks for me when the saddle and hackle feathers become apparent, males have sharp ones, females more rounded ones. A curving tail feather pretty much signifies a male.

    For me it’s often easier to say for sure this is a male versus this is definitely a female. There are exceptions, especially with body and head shape and the legs, but some males are such late developers you can be wrong when guessing female. At least I can.

    At five weeks if you post photos showing the head for comb and wattle development and a profile showing legs and general body build we can probably come pretty close on most chicks. Until then it is pretty rough.
     
  5. lmilano

    lmilano New Egg

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    Feb 14, 2016
    Unfortunately the place that sold the eggs has no information on them. The school bought a breeders choice so it is just a shot in the dark at this point. I will post a picture of the back of the heads this evening.
     
  6. lmilano

    lmilano New Egg

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    Feb 14, 2016
    Thanks for the info everyone! Right now they are 2 weeks old. I was going off of comb size right now as the legs on the one's we thought were pullets are pretty slender. I guess I will wait another couple weeks and see where we are at that point. Appreciate the help :)
     

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