Help sick hen!

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by jzervas92, Oct 25, 2014.

  1. jzervas92

    jzervas92 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Feb 26, 2013
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    Hi everyone, my red sexlink is acting really funny. Shes only 8 months old. She's moving really slow not really eating or drinking. I let them out to free range today and she could care less. She's just sitting around doing nothing. I see no bugs or cuts on her, and her vent isn't clogged but it seems very wet. She was perfectly fine yesterday I have no idea what's going on. It's been hot and cold lately here in New York. Any help would be greatly appreciated.
     
  2. jzervas92

    jzervas92 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Just noticed when she went to the bathroom it came out as a clear liquid
     
  3. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive True BYC Addict Premium Member

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    With the symptoms you describe, I would treat her for coccidiosis with Corid (amprollium, Ampromed.) It is found in cattle medicines in feed stores such as TSC. Worms could also be a problem if she hasn't recently been wormed. Valbazen or fenbendazole (Safeguard Goat Wormer) 1/2 ml given orally, and repeat in 10 days would be good. Check her for mites and lice, as mites can kill by causing anemia. Before doing anything else, though, I would insert a finger, wearing a rubber glove, 1-2 inches into her vent to check for a stuck egg or egg bound. Corid dosage is 2 tsp of the liquid, or 1.5 tsp of the powder per gallon of water for 5-7 days, followed by vitamins and probiotics for several days.

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  4. jzervas92

    jzervas92 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Update: She popped out a soft shelled egg, she's acting a little better now. I brought her inside and cleaned up her vent, there was no damage to it. She's outside right now so I'm going to mix some oyster shells in their feed, I guess free choice isn't working. I'm also thinking about putting some apple cider vinegar in the water too.
     
  5. jzervas92

    jzervas92 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Thank you for the reply do you think I should still treat her for coccidiosis and worms?
     
  6. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive True BYC Addict Premium Member

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    I'm glad she passed the egg, so maybe that was her problem. Watch her to make sure that she is eating, drinking, and acting more normal today. If not I would get the Corid. Worming her and the other s would be good for them if they haven't been lately.
     
  7. jzervas92

    jzervas92 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    She still is acting a little slow and sitting around, but she is walking around now. She also was scratching around when I let her free range. Maybe she has another one to pass, and I've always have given them pumpkin seeds as a natural preventive for worms. How do you worm a chicken?
     
  8. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive True BYC Addict Premium Member

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    I have tried pumpkin seed for worming before I knew better, and have found that Valbazen and fenbendazole (Safeguard Goat Wormer) work best. 1/2 ml of either one given by mouth, by holding the chicken, pulling down on the wattles, place the medicine inside with a syringe or dropper, and then releasing the wattles for them to swallow. Sometimes they will eat it on bread cubes, or inside a grape.
     
  9. jzervas92

    jzervas92 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Really, I better start doing that. How many times a year should I do that?
     
  10. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive True BYC Addict Premium Member

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    Many people worm twice a year, in the spring and in the fall. Some in very cold dry climates can get by doing it once a year. But those who live in very warm humid or rainy areas may do it every 2 months to 4 times a year. If you have had a stool sample tested by a vet, it may tell you what worms are present. Sometimes, with certain more uncommon worms, a higher dosage for 3 to 5 days of Safeguard may be required, but only one dose of Valbazen.
     

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