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Help! Sis is bringing over chick-UPDATE IN LAST POST :(

Discussion in 'Raising Baby Chicks' started by AZmama, May 23, 2007.

  1. AZmama

    AZmama Out Of The Brooder

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    May 16, 2007
    My sis just called, someone gave her a tiny chick for a pet for her 2yo son. [​IMG] She is bringing it to me - NOW - to take care of for her "until it is bigger."
    What should I do with it tonight? All I have is layer pellets and scratch.
    Chicks need to be kept warm, right? Any ideas for a temporary brooder?
    Anything else I need to know?
    Thanks!
     
    Last edited: May 26, 2007
  2. kstaven

    kstaven Overrun With Chickens Premium Member

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    BC, Washington Border
    A box with a lamp over it works in a pinch.

    You can boil up some egg for temporary food, cooked oatmeal or steamed rice will work also. A little fine sand with it for grit if you have it.

    Layer pellets can be soaked and mashed up in a pinch also.

    So you have a few options until you can get chick starter.

    A very shallow dish or jar lid for water.

    Paper towels in the bottom of the box for grip.

    That will get you started.
     
  3. Jsto

    Jsto Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 30, 2007
    North Carolina
    Warmth and water are the most important. Do you know how old the chick is? If it is less than 72 hours, it should be fine without food until you can pick up some starter feed tomorrow, I believe. If it's older than that, someone will more than likely be along soon letting you know what you can give the chick to sustain it until morning.

    Anything contained and draft free should work for a temporary brooder. Just keep it warm and hydrated and it should be fine [​IMG]
     
  4. AZmama

    AZmama Out Of The Brooder

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    May 16, 2007
    It's here!
    It is TINY! I don't know anything about chicks, but it can't be more that a few days old. It's no bigger than an egg, all fluff, egg tooth, eyes closed, soft little chirp, cute as anything!
    She said she tried to feed it tuna, but it wouldn't eat.
    How often do I feed it? How warm does it need to be? It is close to 80 in my house.
    I will use some of your suggestions, thx Jsto and kstaven. Any other ideas, please post.
     
  5. mlheran

    mlheran Chillin' With My Peeps

    If it still has it's egg tooth then it is quite young and should have temps of at least 90ºF. A light over it's brooder box will help keep a warm area for it. Just keep an eye on it and give it a space away from the light to cool off if it's too warm.

    You don't need to feed it in sessions, just leave chick crumbles and water (preferrably in a chick waterer or a dish with marbles so it won't drown) in with it at all times. And no tuna! They'd need grit to tackle that, and besides, when have you ever heard of a momma chick bringing a fish to her chicks? Follow kstaven's food suggestions until you get crumbles.

    You're bound to get more -and better- advice, so good luck! [​IMG]
     
  6. kstaven

    kstaven Overrun With Chickens Premium Member

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    Take a flat shallow bowl and carefully dip the end of the beak in the water once or twice. From there the chick will drink when thirsty. As far as eating goes, just drop a little food on a paper towel and it will investigate it by itself. Curiousity will get the better of it and it will start eating on its own. Do not try to force feed it at all! Tuna is a definate no.

    At that stage and apparent age it needs warmth 90 - 95 degrees and water most of all. That is why the box with a light over it is so important. Just use a big enough box it can get away from the light and find a place where the temperature is right for the chick. They are very smart that way. If the chick is panting you have the light to close. If it is just sitting with its eyes closed for an extended period it has likely been to cool.

    A pinch of sugar in the water may help also. For one day.
     
  7. iopele

    iopele Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:Don't ever give layer pellets to a chick. The calcium content is far too high and even one or two meals can cause irreversible damage to the chick's kidneys and kill it. Storey's Guide recommends an emergency chick feed of half ground (uncooked) oatmeal and half corn meal, but says don't use it for long because it's not nutritionally complete. Better than nothing, though!

    Am I the only one who thinks a chick is really NOT a good pet for a 2 year old, or were my kids just way rougher than average at age 2? Your sister did the right thing in bringing it to you to raise until it's much bigger and stronger, IMO. Good luck!
     
    Last edited: May 23, 2007
  8. chknman79

    chknman79 Out Of The Brooder

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    iopele, I agree with you on a two year old being too young for a baby chick. My boy is 23 months old and is not allowed to hold the baby ducks. At this age they just don't understand and all it would take is a little too hard of a squeeze or something like that to kill the chick, duckling, etc. Good move on mommy's part to send it to someone who can raise it up then the kid can enjoy it more! AZmama Let us know how it is doing.
     
  9. Frozen Feathers

    Frozen Feathers Chillin' With My Peeps

    May 4, 2007
    Maine
    Quote:Well, probably a kid that's never been around chickens, shouldn't have a chick for a pet. I mean, I wouldn't let my daughter play with a newly hatched chick, but I would let her play w/ about 4 weeks and up. My daughter's not your average 2 year old though, [​IMG] and has been around chickens her whole life (such a long one, LOL) and lugging them around since she could walk. She's also been taught to be gentle and respect ALL animals, which a lot of people don't seem to do, then they wonder why the dog bit their kids face of after the kid pulled the dogs tail for 50th time. [​IMG]

    My daughter at 15 months old with a laying hen.
    [​IMG]

    Hopefully AZmamas nephew loses interest before they decide to take the chick back. I wouldn't want my nephew having a chick either, or any animal in their care. My nephews are little devils who've never been taught to respect anything, including their parents. [​IMG] I'd let them "play" w/ one of my roosters, though. [​IMG]
     
  10. iopele

    iopele Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Awwww, love the pic of your daughter and the hen! Yes, it's different when they've been raised around chickens and deal with bigger ones. And we all know that grown chickens will let you know if they don't like their handling, right? [​IMG]

    Oh, hey! As I type this, one of my 9-day old babies just got up on the roost for the first time! (And promptly fell right back off when it tried to turn around, lololol) Sorry, I know it's OT, but had to share the moment!
     

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