help to avoid "inbreeding"

Discussion in 'Managing Your Flock' started by Gazinga, Nov 17, 2008.

  1. Gazinga

    Gazinga Chook Norris

    i have 9 orpington hens and one roo. I want to start letting them hatch a few chicks in addition to providing eggs. I want teh chicks for future egg layers and for meat birds as well. I want to keep the original 10 because they are more like pets to me , i have grown quite attached.
    I want to avoid any possible inbreeding problems as i only have one roo. Am i looking at any potental issues? how to i fix this before they arrise?
     
  2. DTchickens

    DTchickens Overrun With Chickens

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    only inbreeding you have to worry about is brother/sister, and that only matters if your going to show.. or they have a bad disease (CRD or some other genetic illness) in them.... then it could bring it out. if you want just sell the new ones. or breed son/mother. father/daughters etc (yeah, its inbreeding as well. but doesn't hurt anything)
     
  3. redhen

    redhen Kiss My Grits... Premium Member

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    "How to aviod inbreeding?"...well....first..stay away from Arkansas....[​IMG]..
     
  4. halo

    halo Got The Blues

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    I keep reading about avoiding brother/sister breedings, and no one can relay why this is. With other species its often done with excellent results, as long as the individuals used are quality. So is this another one of those "well, I read it somewhere on the internet, so it must be true" deals, or is there documented reasoning why this is?
     
  5. MissPrissy

    MissPrissy Overrun With Chickens Premium Member

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    Line breeding is very well accepted in chickens. You don't have to worry about the genetics as much as you would other species of animals.

    Mother/son and Father/daughter breeding programs are nothing to worry over.

    The brother/sister breeding is cautious due to 1. you can get exceptional chicks that feature the really good traits of both parents and 2. you can get really bad chicks that exhibit and exaggerate the very worst traits of the parents. Those you will never want to breed and will need to cull from a breeding program.
     
  6. lurky

    lurky Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jun 4, 2007
    Western MA
    Quote:I think this is also a qualification to apply for "my big redneck wedding" [​IMG]
     
  7. halo

    halo Got The Blues

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    Quote:I don't see why the brother/sister breeding is any different than a father/daughter breeding. In both you can either get very good chicks, or bad chicks, depending on whether the rooster is carrying a recessive genetic defect. A brother and a sister, from what little I understand, will not have the same genetic material, even with the same mother and father. Look at your own children for verification of that. Is there documentation on this, or is it just something that someone once said and it was taken as gospel?
     
    Last edited: Nov 17, 2008
  8. the1much

    the1much Currently Birdless Hippy

    when you breed bro/sis ,, you get exaggerated traits of the mom/dad ,, is ALWAYS that way,, when you breed dad/daughter you get the traits of dad brought down the line.
    this is how we bred mice in the genetics lab. if we had a dad with a genetic trait,, say Parkinson ,, you bred with a mouse without,,,, then half the offspring would have it, the other half culled,, now take the dad, breed with daughters that had Park., and ALL of their offspring would have Park.
    dad/daughter is not inbreeding, its incest,, bro/sis breeding, is inbreeding.
     
  9. MissPrissy

    MissPrissy Overrun With Chickens Premium Member

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    Breeders often avoid brother/sister pairings because you CONCENTRATE the faults. A wrong eye color in a brother/sister breeding pair CONCENTRATES the genetics of producing chicks with that fault. Same thing with confirmation, head size, feathering, etc.

    Yes, you can hatch bad chicks from a mother/son and father/daughter but you have the mother or father's different genes in there shaking it up. Hatching the brother/sister chicks you are not improving the genetics pool just concentrating what you have already established. While you can get really good chicks you also have a higher chance of getting very bad chicks with lots of faults that would take a very long time to breed out of them.

    Why would you want to produce a flock of chicks with really bad concentration of traits when you can avoid it?
     
  10. halo

    halo Got The Blues

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    Quote:I must be dense, because I still don't get it. Number one, if I were improving my flock, I wouldnt be breeding, for example, a wrong eye color back into the flock. That would be culled. In breeding a brother/sister, you don't know what genetic dna has been passed on to each from the father/mother. Just because they are brother/sister, doesnt mean they are cloned. If you hatch out 20 eggs from a roo and a hen, odds are you'll have 20 different looking babies, unless from a inbred line already. I don't mean to be argumentative, I just think this isnt as simplistic as its made out to be.

    I hope the genetics guru chimes in here.
     

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