Help! Urgent!

Discussion in 'Other Pets & Livestock' started by Josh45640, May 8, 2011.

  1. Josh45640

    Josh45640 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 1, 2011
    SE Ohio
    My Flemish Giant bunny is acting very odd. It is about 3 months old. It is normally kept in a pen with a NZW (same age from same farm) and a lionhead doe (year old). Usually it meets you at the dor of the pen when it sees yu coming wanting attention. When I went out to feed a little bit ago, it was sitting at the back f the cage shaking back and forth. Almost like it cant keep its head up. When it tries to move it only makes it a couple steps and falls down on its side, then gets back up and sits there and shakes. The breathing looks to have slowed some as well. Looks like the normal breathing pace for a human, not a rabbit. I should als mention that it eats a lot f fresh clover,grass, daisy, etc.... from my yard. It has never acted funny, yesterday it was fine.
     
  2. Josh45640

    Josh45640 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 1, 2011
    SE Ohio
    Sorry for the typos. My "O" key isnt working right for some reason.
     
  3. bobwhitelover

    bobwhitelover Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 18, 2011
    SOmerset
    He could have broken his neck or eaten some poisionous.
     
  4. Josh45640

    Josh45640 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 1, 2011
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    The neck deffinately isnt broken. I got him out and he seems to be eating normal, just very sluggish. The only access to anything poisonous wuld be something frm my yard. What common weeds are poisonous to rabbits? I just grap random handfulls of clover and grass and give it to them. I do the same thing to my chickens and ducks with no problems. Ofcourse they get comercial feed too, the grass is just extra because they seem to like it.
     
  5. bobwhitelover

    bobwhitelover Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:Well idk he could be in shock from something scaring him really bad I have had that happen to rabbits and they acted like you described.
     
  6. Sachasmom

    Sachasmom Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Mar 1, 2009
    Upstate NY
    I posted my reply in your other post, I'll copy/paste what I wrote here:

    I'd def take it out of the cage and isolate it from your other two buns. Bring it inside and put it in a warm, quiet place so you can more closely evaluate it.
    Its possible that it ate something toxic, are you also feeding pellets/hay? I have Kelp powder on hand for any sort of toxin poisening, but I *think* a Vit E liquid capsule may be a substitute, you'd have
    to google it though. You'd have to google toxic plants in your area, I'd be careful feeding anything you don't know what plant it is.

    How do the other two bunnies look? How long have you had the bunny, and did you quarintine your new rabbits before you put them in with the other bunny? I'd def take that LH doe out before the other bunnies breed her,
    unless of course you have all does, and even then they may start to fight and kill the smaller bunny once their hormones start in.

    Take it out and look over it, listen to its breathing (does it sound congested?) Check its poop (Is it runny? Is it pooping?) Check its belly, does it look bloated?
    Run your hand down its back, does it feel spiney? Check its teeth for malclusion and its legs for breaks at the hock (or sore hocks)
    Is it *rolling* like they would with Wry Neck? (Check its eyes for rapid back and forth movement)


    If you have Pedialyte on hand or some other electrolyte that would not be a bad thing to give it, might help perk it up.

    Rabbits being prey animals they often hide that something is wrong until its bad, unfortunetly. A lot of the signs of a problem are really subtle.
     

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