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Help, what is on my chicken's butt?

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by livelikeyoucan, Nov 26, 2014.

  1. livelikeyoucan

    livelikeyoucan New Egg

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    Apr 11, 2014
    My hen had diarrhea for a few weeks. I try to keep her cleaned, however, every time I wipe off this white bumpy looking stuff, it comes back the next day. What in the world is it? fungus? from diarrhea? Please help. Thank you

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  2. RoostersCrow HensDeliver!

    RoostersCrow HensDeliver! Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 11, 2011
    SE Michigan
    Looks like vent gleet. If it smells similar to a rotting animal carcass, then it is gleet and you can treat it with feminine fungal infection medicine.
     
  3. livelikeyoucan

    livelikeyoucan New Egg

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    Apr 11, 2014
    oh my gosh, thank you so much...Janis
     
  4. RoostersCrow HensDeliver!

    RoostersCrow HensDeliver! Chillin' With My Peeps

    1,920
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    Apr 11, 2011
    SE Michigan
    Your welcome. You will know whether it's gleet or not because of the unique smell. I have used generic Monistat and had good luck with it. Make sure you separate the bird from the rest of the flock IF you have a rooster, as he could potentially spread it to the other hens.
     
  5. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

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    Apr 3, 2011
    southern Ohio
    While vent gleet may be the problem, you can bring her inside and soak her vent area in either epsom salts or warm soapy water. When the vent area is clean and dry you could post another picture. If there are whitish or yellowish patches on an inflamed area or foul smelling droppings, that can be vent gleet. Just having diarrhea getting caught on feathers is usually just that--scald from droppings. Many chickens have this problem, and may need vent feathers trimmed back to prevent catching poo. Probiotics such as Probios Dispersible Powder and Gro2Max may help promote good intestinal health. If it is indeed vent gleet, then probiotics, antifungal medications such as Nystatin, Medistatin, and others may help, along with Miconazole or Monistat 7 cream applied to vent area. Here is some reading:
    http://www.tillysnest.com/2012/12/vent-gleet-prevention-and-treatment.html
    http://birdhealth.com.au/flockbirds/poultry/diseases/vent_gleet.html
     

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