Help! What kind of chickens do we Have?

Discussion in 'Managing Your Flock' started by teresaplus8, Aug 5, 2013.

  1. teresaplus8

    teresaplus8 Out Of The Brooder

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    Jul 7, 2013
    Can anyone tell us what kind of chickens we have? We were told by both stores that these were all Rhode Island Reds. As you can see this is not the case. The lighter golden brown ones are very calm and docile, while the darker red ones are aggressive and skittish. The golden ones have always looked healthy, full, and kept. where as the red ones have had issues with being able to grow their feathers back, and have always looked mangy. All are kept in same building but with a divider. It is getting close to the time to put them together and we don't want the golden ones hurt or to start looking mangy too. Any advice would be appreciated. Thanks!
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  2. redsoxs

    redsoxs Chicken Obsessed

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    I'd say you have a batch of Buff Orps...you're better off!! When you put them together there will be some pecking order battles...the reds will likely be higher in the order than the more docile buffs. But both groups should be fine together. Good luck to you!
     
  3. WoodlandWoman

    WoodlandWoman Overrun With Chickens

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    Yes, those look like buff Orpingtons. They are very nice chickens and do have a more docile temperament. Keep a close eye on them when you put them together, so they don't get seriously injured.

    You can check for external parasites. It may very well just be from molting. As chickens grow up, they are constantly losing smaller feathers and growing new, larger feathers, to keep up with the larger size of their bodies. A lot of half grown chickens look pretty mangy at times. Even some adults do, during a molt. They don't all look the same. Some lose their feathers and regrow them at a slower pace, so you don't notice as much. Some dump a lot of feathers all at once and even have bald patches. Orps are also big poof balls of loose feathers, that may cover the more bare spots a little better. A darker feathered breed with lighter under feathers also shows gaps more, due to the contrast in color. Once they're all fully grown, they won't be constantly molting anymore.
     
  4. teresaplus8

    teresaplus8 Out Of The Brooder

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    Thank you! We knew the one store had to be full of it. We definitely like the Orpingtons better. They are much prettier and easier to work with. Thanks again!!
     
  5. teresaplus8

    teresaplus8 Out Of The Brooder

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    Jul 7, 2013
    Can either of you tell us...if we put them all together before the younger ones are old enough to lay will they mess with the eggs of the older ones?
     
  6. donrae

    donrae Hopelessly Addicted Premium Member

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    Mine never have. I usually have young birds in with my layer flock and they just don't notice the eggs.
     

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