Help with assisted hatch

Discussion in 'Incubating & Hatching Eggs' started by lagraham123, Aug 4, 2014.

  1. lagraham123

    lagraham123 Out Of The Brooder

    49
    0
    32
    Mar 11, 2013
    Hello!

    I had 12 eggs set. 3 hatched with no issues. I moved them to the brooder this morning. I then proceeded to candle and float the remaining eggs to check for life. None appeared to be alive. I decided to do an eggtopsy, all were dead beside 1, as I began to open it, I noticed breathing. I then saw the baby move her mouth. I did see some blood and I stopped, however the blood was going into her mouth, so I had to make a hole in the membrane a little so she wouldnt drown. This was earlier today, hours ago. The tesmp and humidity are good in the bator. Baby is still moving a little, and she will open and close her mouth if I rouse the bator by tapping on the top. I am not sure if I heard her peep because I have 3 other babies in the same room. The blood seen in the bator is from an egg that I opened that had died. What should I do for this one? I am thinking just keep an eye on her? I know that they can't hatch until they absorb blood and yolk, and that trying any further right now could be deadly. Help PLEASE~~~ Her beak is to the left in this picture. Thank you!~i[​IMG]
     
  2. Alaskan

    Alaskan The Frosted Flake

    Put a warm moist paper towel over her egg.

    Then, read through the assisted hatch article. I have trouble pasting in links with this tablet, so I hope you can find it.

    :hugs
     
  3. lagraham123

    lagraham123 Out Of The Brooder

    49
    0
    32
    Mar 11, 2013
    thank you!!! Over the entire egg? Im assuming I need to leave room to breathe?
     
  4. Audra9

    Audra9 New Egg

    7
    0
    7
    Jul 21, 2014
    It is always sad when the hatch doesn't turn out as you hoped. I would leave it alone and watch it closely. You are right that if you break it out too soon, the yolk may not absorb properly, or the "belly button" may not heal closed like it should.

    It is hard to leave something alone when you desperately want to intervene. If it were mine, I'd probably be hovering over it anxiously, looking for something I could do and feeling helpless all the same. The best thing to do is leave it and be patient. If it has a chance of surviving, it just might pull through.

    You may want to change the bedding, though. It is possible the other eggs had some kind of bacterial problem that caused them to die, so you should limit exposure..

    Good Luck!
     
  5. Alaskan

    Alaskan The Frosted Flake


    I usually sort of tent the warm moist paper towel over the egg.
     
  6. lagraham123

    lagraham123 Out Of The Brooder

    49
    0
    32
    Mar 11, 2013
    Ok! So I did that! She is moving more, and was chirping when I wrapped her. Now what? How will I know if she needs more help out??
     
  7. lagraham123

    lagraham123 Out Of The Brooder

    49
    0
    32
    Mar 11, 2013
    There is still a blood colored membrane. I'm really not sure what to do. I'll get a better picture.
     
  8. Alaskan

    Alaskan The Frosted Flake

  9. lagraham123

    lagraham123 Out Of The Brooder

    49
    0
    32
    Mar 11, 2013
    Thank you for the help! Here is a new picture. It's a little better then the first one. I wrapped her in a dish cloth. [​IMG]
     
  10. Alaskan

    Alaskan The Frosted Flake

    Looks good.

    Try not to let the damp cloth touch the membrane, because it might wick out some of the blood too.

    The membrane is still very red, which makes me think that the chick just isn't quite ready. You will have to wait and see what it looks like tomorrow.

    I would worry (or at least, prepare yourself), I have found that when a chick is that far behind, it often doesn't make it. I have had some late to hatch chicks that looked OK for a day and then die.

    So...my take home message

    1. Read that article through at least twice (link is in my earlier post)

    2. I would guess the chick needs to sit until tomorrow, damp washcloth, not actually touching membrane, but hands off until the morning.

    3. Keep looking at the cute hatched chicks you do have, and keep reminding yourself that they can't all make it.

    4. Read through the article again!


    Good luck!!
     

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by