Help with coop construction

Discussion in 'Coop & Run - Design, Construction, & Maintenance' started by Kataloo, Feb 20, 2014.

  1. Kataloo

    Kataloo Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Hi all chicken lovers and especially coop builders-

    Disclaimer: I am not experienced at carpentry, although I do enjoy it. This will be, by far, my most ambitious project. I am going to take it slow and do it in steps and I know I can do it; however, I don't know the correct terminology, so I hope you can understand what I am trying to ask: [​IMG]

    1) When building the coop/run should I sink the four corner posts 2 or 3 feet below grade so that the coop will be stable in high winds, or do I not have to worry about that? Looking at the construction pictures posted online it seems that most people don't.

    2) I am trying to build a budget coop, while having it be strong, predator proof, and attractive. I want to have 3-4 chickens. I have chosen a 4x12 coop/run because that seems like it would be the most economical having little waste due to the fact that plywood and siding comes in 4x8 panels. Any tips to save money?

    3) Is a foundation of cinder blocks and pavers a good idea? Why or why not?

    4) If I do build a foundation of pavers and cinderblocks, do I attach the base of the coop to the foundation of pavers? Or just set it on top? If I attach it, I assume this would be done with cement nails.

    Thanks so VERY much. [​IMG]

    P.S. This may or may not be helpful information: I haven't decided to sink the hardware cloth or construct an apron. I assume the price would be about the same for either.
     
    Last edited: Feb 20, 2014
  2. jetdog

    jetdog Chillin' With My Peeps

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    4X6X7ft tall and the total came in at $230.00, I'm setting it on cement blocks, home depot has a 70 percent off rack with slightly damaged lumber and plywood check there for good deals, habitat for humanity store near me had the plywood for the roof just trimmed off the damaged end, got all the paint there to half price, I would leave it up a little so they can go under it for some shade, I would definitely use hardware cloth it will cost the most, some things you can find cheap but not the hardware cloth, use the apron idea for diggers, steak it down with landscape spikes. Hope there will be pictures as the progress goes.
     
  3. Tjschicks1817

    Tjschicks1817 Out Of The Brooder

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    [​IMG] I just built my coop and wish it only cost 230$.lol. It cost roughly 4-500$ to build including the run and poultry wire. The two most expensive parts of the coop was the poultry wire 75$ Home Depot for 150' I have still about 100' left though. You can probably get 50' for 40-50$. And the T1-11 siding which runs 24.00 4x8 sheet. I needed six so 150.00 on siding.
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  4. Kataloo

    Kataloo Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Good lookin' coops!! Thanks good info!! I want to have a covered run, so I know my coop will cost more. I have seen some coops on BYC that I want to copy and they are stating around $1,000 or more. I hope to spend about half that. Good advise on the damaged lumber and plywood at Home Depot. I will certainly check that out. I will also head to the habitat for humanity store when I can. I'm on a quest to find hardware wire on the cheap. (Or the cheep [​IMG])

    I still hope someone replies about sinking the corner posts. We can get some strong winds in Utah, but nothing like tornado or hurricane winds. Will the weight just keep the thing in place?
     
  5. ClovisMan

    ClovisMan Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I would only sink posts if you have really high winds but in reality it depends on construction. If it is more wide than tall, I would worry about it.

    To save money, you can recycle the wood from pallets. They work well and are sometime hardwoods.

    Putting down cinder blocks or gravel is a good idea. It helps with drainage and gives you a solid level base to build on.

    You normally would not attach the building to the block. If you are worried about it moving you can use mobile home anchors.
    Like these: http://www.sears.com/arrow-buildings-ground-anchor-kit/p-07160297000P

    I'm still not finished with mine. Who wants to help!!! LOL
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    It's 8 wide by 12 deep with 8 foot ceiling. Should be plenty big.
     
    Last edited: Feb 20, 2014
    1 person likes this.
  6. blucoondawg

    blucoondawg Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I built mine similar to ClovisMan's coop except mine is 12x12 and doesn't have the gable roof, mine is sitting on blocks which are sitting on 16x16 pavers to slow the blocks from settling into the ground.

    If you wanted to attach the coop to a block foundation I wouldn't use concrete nails, I haven't really ever found a useful purpose for concrete nails myself and I doubt they would be at all useful in driving into a block without cracking or breaking the block. If you wanted to go that route I would do it the same as they attach a garage or home to a foundation, fill in some of the cores of the blocks with mortar or cement and put an anchor bolt in the cement, bolt a wood plate of 2x4 or whatever you want to the blocks then nail or screw your coop to that. You could also skip the anchor bolts and just drill a hole through the wood plate and into the concrete poured core and use a drive in anchor or thread in anchor but that would require the use of a hammer drill which I don't know if you have that access.
     
  7. Kataloo

    Kataloo Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Thanks for the input. I think I will go ahead with the cinder blocks and pavers. Probably won't worry about attaching it. As I thought about it, no one I know of attaches their "Tuff Sheds". I think this would be about the same.

    I went to Pinterest and got some ideas for chicken coops from wood pallets. Thanks for the idea. Clovis Man, I'd grab a hammer if I were visitin' my son in Texas. Good luck!
     
  8. Sam3 Abq

    Sam3 Abq Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Building our coop right now and using cmu and pavers - do not pplan toattach to wood base. See at "7 heavenly hens garden coop construction" pprogress photos. -sam
     

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