Help with giving meds and eating the eggs again

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by Freebie, Oct 9, 2007.

  1. Freebie

    Freebie Chillin' With My Peeps

    Feb 4, 2007
    Bloomingdale, MI
    Is anyone familiar with an antibacterial ointment called Nitrofurazone? I was wondering what the time is after application that you can eat the eggs. I have looked on the internet and I can not make heads or tails of what it says. So I was just wondering if anyone has had any experience with it.
     
  2. dlhunicorn

    dlhunicorn Human Encyclopedia

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    http://www.fda.gov/cvm/FOI/738.htm
    (easy
    language)

    are you using this as an eye ointment/topical application I assume?(should not be used internally):
    http://www.merckvetmanual.com/mvm/index.jsp?cfile=htm/bc/203903.htm
    "Nitrofurazone: This has been used to treat several bacterial diseases in poultry, but is no longer approved for use in the USA. When fed at 0.022%, it causes hyperexcitability manifest by rapid movements, loud squawking, and frequent falling forward. In turkeys, which are more sensitive to nitrofurazone than are chickens, it produces cardiac dilatation, ascites, and when fed at 0.033%, death. "
     
  3. Freebie

    Freebie Chillin' With My Peeps

    Feb 4, 2007
    Bloomingdale, MI
    Residues have been reported in the fatty tissue of chickens and turkeys in excess of the 5 ppm permitted in edible tissue, and in egg products in excess of the permitted 0.5 ppm. PCB depress egg production and hatchability, and levels of 50 ppm result in cirrhosis of the liver and ascites in broilers and a drop in egg production and hatchability in hens. (See also halogenated cyclic hydrocarbon poisoning, Halogenated Aromatic Poisoning: Introduction.)

    So would you think this to mean you can not eat the eggs anymore ever? I used it on her one time, as an ointment. The vet that let me use it said that she would not eat the eggs. I was just wondering... I don't want to put her down. she is recovering from a horrible dog bite. and that is why I applies the ointment. She said it would work, but I would never be able to eat her, I said that was fine, I don't intend to eat her anyway. What about the eggs? she was not sure, but then called later and said she would not eat them. I don't know what I am going to do.

    I would really appreciate any imput anyone may have on this.
     
    Last edited: Oct 10, 2007
  4. snugglepup

    snugglepup Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Creedmoor, NC
    I would err on the side of caution and not eat the eggs. When we used this on horses in school it worked very well, but we were told to use gloves when applying it and never to use it if you were pregnant.
     
  5. Freebie

    Freebie Chillin' With My Peeps

    Feb 4, 2007
    Bloomingdale, MI
    Quote:Not eat the eggs ever?? Or is there a waiting period like everything else?? That seems to be the information I can not find.
     
    Last edited: Oct 10, 2007
  6. dlhunicorn

    dlhunicorn Human Encyclopedia

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    hmmm... seems a bit extreme on the eggs... maybe three months? no idea on that one really
     
  7. Freebie

    Freebie Chillin' With My Peeps

    Feb 4, 2007
    Bloomingdale, MI
    Quote:Thanks dlhunicorn. I thought maybe I had missed something in the reading. I just don't want to put her down. My husband thinks that is the best answer. I know I can not get her ovaries removed. That is just something I can not afford.
    I just feel that she survived such a horrible attack, and is in such good spirits, that there is no way I can do that. We are thinking of making her a little place of her own and maybe giving her a friend to hang out with, and just throwing the eggs away in there little area. I don't know yet. I have plenty of time to look for more information on it. She will be separated from them for sometime, as she has quite a bit of healing to do before she can be allowed out.

    I just wish I could tell her eggs apart from the others.
     
  8. seminolewind

    seminolewind Flock Mistress Premium Member

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    spring hill, florida
    I think I would contact Cornell University in New York, sorry, don't have the number, but we used to call them and ask questions about Lyme's and West Nile. Or find some University that has a vet program.
    I would not jump to conclusions before researching this. Is there a phone number on the ointment? Maybe you can contact the manufacturer.
    May I suggest that instead you can use betadine, let it dry on the wound, or betadine ointment. I swear by betadine, it kills everything and helps wounds heal faster. Hospitals scrub patients with it before surgery.
     
  9. dlhunicorn

    dlhunicorn Human Encyclopedia

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    I will see if I can look up some university contacts for you which might be able to answer that particular question...you can send off an email explaining the situation and pose your question on the eggs (withdrawal period)... I have found university professors to be very generous in answering questions... comparing replies will give you more info...
    Give me a day or two to look it up for you.
     
  10. Freebie

    Freebie Chillin' With My Peeps

    Feb 4, 2007
    Bloomingdale, MI
    Thank you again. I never thought of doing that.

    seminolewind-- I have never used betadine, but will give it a look see and check it out. She is doing much better, and I am not putting anything on it right now. She is in a cage and can not really roll around to get her back all dirty, so I will check her a few times a day and see what needs to be done. She is getting antibiotics in her water, and those have a 10 day withdrawl time.

    You all have been awesome. thank you so much.
     

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