Help with Mallard Genders

speckledegg728

Chirping
Oct 14, 2016
28
1
54
Rural Ohio.
In mid April we got two Mallard ducklings from a local feed store. We think they're five weeks old now, maybe six. I believe we have one male and one female, but the rest of my family thinks we have two males.

My reasoning: one of them has grown bigger rapidly even though they started at the same size, has a "hoarser" voice, and doesn't vocalize much unless frightened. "He" began feathering sooner than the smaller duckling as well.

The smaller duckling has a clear, louder peep that I think might become a quack soon. "She" is still noticeably smaller than the one I assume to be male, and is more prone to drama, as I like to say. Her feathers are coming in a little slower, but she is starting to catch up.

My family's reasoning: both duckling's heads have a green sheen when seen in the sun.

What is correct? Can the green sheen of the head feathers determine the sex, even though adult feathers aren't supposed to grow in for a few months and voice sexing is supposed to be a quicker way to determine gender?
 

Chicken Momma6

In the Brooder
May 20, 2017
8
9
21
In mid April we got two Mallard ducklings from a local feed store. We think they're five weeks old now, maybe six. I believe we have one male and one female, but the rest of my family thinks we have two males.

My reasoning: one of them has grown bigger rapidly even though they started at the same size, has a "hoarser" voice, and doesn't vocalize much unless frightened. "He" began feathering sooner than the smaller duckling as well.

The smaller duckling has a clear, louder peep that I think might become a quack soon. "She" is still noticeably smaller than the one I assume to be male, and is more prone to drama, as I like to say. Her feathers are coming in a little slower, but she is starting to catch up.

My family's reasoning: both duckling's heads have a green sheen when seen in the sun.

What is correct? Can the green sheen of the head feathers determine the sex, even though adult feathers aren't supposed to grow in for a few months and voice sexing is supposed to be a quicker way to determine gender?
Based on my experience, both sexes have the green sheen on their heads. You are correct that the males have a more hoarse voice and the females seem more alert, reactive, and are loud mouths. It's been awhile since I've had mallard ducklings, so I'm not sure of their feathering at this stage. I could also predict the sex by their chest pattern. The males have small uniform dots. The females have a more messy mottled pattern of uneven marks. Also, my drakes had softer green tinted beaks, while my hens had bright orange. I hope this helps.
 

speckledegg728

Chirping
Oct 14, 2016
28
1
54
Rural Ohio.
Based on my experience, both sexes have the green sheen on their heads. You are correct that the males have a more hoarse voice and the females seem more alert, reactive, and are loud mouths. It's been awhile since I've had mallard ducklings, so I'm not sure of their feathering at this stage. I could also predict the sex by their chest pattern. The males have small uniform dots. The females have a more messy mottled pattern of uneven marks. Also, my drakes had softer green tinted beaks, while my hens had bright orange. I hope this helps.

This is really helpful, thank you! I'll check the two of them for the characteristics you added.
 

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