help with metal roof panels...

Discussion in 'Coop & Run - Design, Construction, & Maintenance' started by jojomojo, Nov 17, 2013.

  1. jojomojo

    jojomojo Out Of The Brooder

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    Feb 12, 2009
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    I have some metal roof panels we got for free that I want to use on a small coop we're building. I'll say up front I really don't know what I'm doing, but I'm trying to figure it out :)

    Is it a good idea to have plywood or some other underlayment under the panels?

    How do I finish off the edges? I imagine they are going to be pretty sharp. This coop won't be very tall or very high off the ground (broody/silkie coop), so those edges are going to be bumped into I'm sure.

    Is there a way to use this for the top hinged lid of a nest box too? I could always use wood, but it would be nice if it matched. Any tips or pictures of this?

    Any tips on cutting them?

    Thanks in advance for any help!
     
  2. chickwhispers

    chickwhispers A French Hen

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    My Coop
    I am just finishing up my run with these. I like them, but there are a few things I would do different.
    I put purlins on (2x4s) and I would recommend investing in the plywood, it would have been so much easier to work on and finish off. You will need to get the screws for the panels, they have a rubber gasket to seal out water. The panel ends are sharp if you have to cut them. I used a jig saw with a metal blade. They have tools for that but our tool rental didn't carry them. Go figure. I didn't finish off the ends, gable or eaves, because it's a run not a coop. I may change my mind and add later though, on gable ends. If you have to cut the panels be sure to use a straight edge as a guide to help keep your line straight, it's very easy to off if you use just a line. If you use on the top of hinged nest box, just allow enough room to open where the raised parts of the panels are. If you put the hinges on top of the panels be sure to use the roofing screws with rubber gaskets there too. There are numerous good videos on line on you tube to show you many good tips. Good luck and enjoy your new roof!
     
    Last edited: Nov 17, 2013
  3. Little block

    Little block New Egg

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    Nov 13, 2013
    Depending on the difference between daytime and night time temperatures where condensation may be an issue, you will probably get away with just the iron roofing material. If you do need to allow for condensation, a lining of building paper will assist.

    There are several ways to cut iron, Tin Snips (watch your hands as you will have a high side and a low side on your snip face and be running your hands near the cut edges). Skil Saw or Angle grinder with a metal blade. This would be my preference if you have access to either as the cuts are nice and straight and can be made with the panel on a secure surface.
    You can screw a length of timber on the underside of the panel to attach hinges for the flap.
    Without going out and having flashings folded out of flat iron, again sections of 15-25mm thick flat timber about 75-100mm wide fixed to the edges 1 length on the flat down the length of the iron and a second piece at right angles with the top piece overlapping the bottom which is vertical.(You will end up with an upside down capital L). Perhaps not the most watertight method these days but has the rustic effect, and can also be made using resourced timber. It will protect the sharp edges of the iron.
    Hope this helps.


    Dave
     
  4. glk83

    glk83 New Egg

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    as well as the condensation, the plywood will significantly reduce noise from rain, you might wan't to cover with roofers felt also. the edges can be covered with a flashing like the other person mentioned. You can see it here on the gable end (http://www.fabral.com/light-commercial/light-commercial-project-gallery/) it can be purchased at Menard's (you can get the screws there as well. We cut ours with a metal blade on a circ saw, just be sure to clean the burrs and touch up the cut edge. The other nice thing about laying plywood/osb is that you don't have to be particular about where you step installing the metal. they also make foam inserts for the ends, where the ribs leave openings.
     
  5. jojomojo

    jojomojo Out Of The Brooder

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    Feb 12, 2009
    NW New Mexico
    Thanks for the replies & ideas! It sounds like plywood & roofing felt is the way to go. Our temps here can really swing, 20°-30° always, 40° from day to night is not uncommon.
     
  6. handyman42

    handyman42 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Corrugated "barn tin" are always how I go. They're pretty easy to install I just run mine on 2x4's with no plywood or felt. just run the 2x4's the opposite way you're running your panels so you'll have something to screw to. I also use them for coop siding and various other things. I'd say they're a chicken keepers best friend because 1) They're fairly inexpensive for the amount of material you get, 2) They can literally be used for almost anything that has to do with chickens, 3) They last almost forever (especially when painted) and 4) They're easy to work with. All you need is a tape measure, straight edge to mark your lines, a saw, drill and screws and you've got it done. I would highly recommend using barn panels for chickens. use em as roofing, siding, reinforcement for the base of your coop, build an auto feeder out of them, cover nest boxes with them, make doors out of them , Go Crazy with them. literally you can almost do anything your mind can think up with Barn tin. I Love The Stuff.
     
  7. debp

    debp Chillin' With My Peeps

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    We just had a metal pole barn built to house our future chickens and our tractor. I can see that in our climate, not using OSB sheeting below the metal for the roof was a mistake. It was 8 degrees last night and with the Rocky Mountain sun hitting this am, water is dripping off the bottom of all the inside metal roof surfaces, even where it is an open 3 sided barn. It is not an unusually humid day, either. We have no animals yet. Now, I'm not sure what the best fix is. Taking off the roof and putting on plywood would be expensive. Would insulation of at least the closed coop area be cheaper? I'm worried that we will get condensation between the roof and the insulation, which could be worse. Also, at my request the builder left a small (1") space between top of the wall of the coop area and metal roof open for ventilation, and if we insulate right up to the wall, that gap would get closed off. Any suggestions for fixes?
     
  8. ECBW

    ECBW Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I recycled some aluminum sheets for roof on my coop and run. These panels have ridges and so has some rigidity. I used plywood under them on the coop and no plywood at the run. Results, the run section bowed or bent under the weight of the icy snow. the coop roof was fine.
     
  9. Mountain Man 60

    Mountain Man 60 Out Of The Brooder

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    Sep 19, 2013
    I did a few coops this year using the tin roofing available at local big box stores. I would recommend using it without cutting. Use the excess for an overhang to keep the sun/rain off of your birds. It is a pain to cut and grind the sharp edges. Extend the frame beyond the length of the overhang if you can to provide stability as you stated you wanted to lift the top. I would recommend making the back hinge down rather than the top lift as it would be less disturbing and if you have snow or rain you do not have to worry about where it would go when you lift the top. I used a 2x4 and with U hardware to close up the door and two hinges on the bottom. Overlap the pieces of tin and use the screws with rubber washers to attach to a 2x4 frame. If you really want to protect yourself from the edges have the edges end half way across the 2x4 leaving a wood edge to prevent contact with the metal edge. Once you have the metal roof add a plastic gutter and route water to a 5 gallon bucket with nipples on the bottom for birds to drink.
     
  10. chickwhispers

    chickwhispers A French Hen

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    Northwest OH
    My Coop
    debp: To help against condensation, put that foil over bubble wrap insulation up, and leave the 1" gap open all the way up to the ridgevent. You can purchase at big box stores. It can be put up with staples or use lathing cross ways every so far to hold it up. Just make sure you do leave at least the 1" inch gap for air flow. Hope this helps![​IMG]
     

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