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Help!! with pullet/swollen leg

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by King CreekRanch, Apr 27, 2017.

  1. King CreekRanch

    King CreekRanch Out Of The Brooder

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    This morning I found one of my pullets with a swollen leg first 2 pics. the last pic. is of one of my pullets that hatched with her so you can compare. They are 5 weeks old, the leg is very hard. She usually stays with the rest of the group but she is just by her self and won't walk very much. My only guess would be green stick leg but I'am not familiar with it any help/how to treat it/what it would be would be wonderful.
     
  2. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

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    I am really not an expert on leg issues, but it looks like pictures I have seen of osteopetrosis, which usually affects both legs. The leg shaft looks thick, feels hard, and the foot stays a normal size, which makes it look too small. Osteopetrosis is a type of avian leukosis. Don't worry about this being your chick's problem though--I just wanted to suggest something that looks like your picture. It could be like you say, a green stick or even a spiral fracture. Do her footpads look clear of any spots?
     
  3. King CreekRanch

    King CreekRanch Out Of The Brooder

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    Yes her footpads look clear and normal. Is what you mentioned able to pass on to the other birds? And does she have a chance to live?
     
  4. HiddenHills

    HiddenHills Just Hatched

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    Hi there! One of my pullets looked similarly a couple weeks ago. I think it was a sprain. She would not put any weight on the affected leg at all. I moved her to the brooder to confine movement. 3 weeks later, she is right as rain and has returned to the flock. If your pullet is eating/ drinking well I'd suggest confining her to reduce stress on that leg and letting her heal on her own. Good luck!
     
  5. King CreekRanch

    King CreekRanch Out Of The Brooder

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    Thank you! Was your pullet just hurt on one leg or both?
     
  6. HiddenHills

    HiddenHills Just Hatched

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    It was just one leg. She would hold it tucked up against her body and balance on the good leg at first. Gradually she started using the bad leg to balance, and then would limp around on it, and eventually back to full weight bearing. Her leg is still slightly more swollen than the other one but she gets around just fine!
     
  7. King CreekRanch

    King CreekRanch Out Of The Brooder

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    Anyone else?
     
  8. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

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    I don't think it is osteopetrosis, because like I stated, it usually affects both legs. It may be broken. A soft splint out of cotton wrap and paper tape or vet wrap, for a couple of weeks would be what I would try. I would change it once a week to allow for growing. Make sure it is not too tight which would cause more swelling. A chick chair or sling may keep her upright and place food and water within reach.
     
    Last edited: Apr 27, 2017
  9. King CreekRanch

    King CreekRanch Out Of The Brooder

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    Sorry I forgot to mention both legs are swollen. Sorry.
     
  10. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

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    She still may be too young for osteopetrosis. I am really hoping that is not her problem. Here are a couple of links, and within the second I have listed many other articles and threads with pictures:
    https://www.askjpc.org/vspo/show_page.php?id=242
    https://www.backyardchickens.com/t/1018149/large-deformed-legs (be sure to click on the other links within this article which has a lot of pictures)

    From The Merck Veterinary Manual:

    Osteopetrosis:

    Osteopetrosis in chickens is due to infection with specific strains of avian leukosis virus (see Lymphoid Leukosis in Poultry). Growth and differentiation of osteoblasts is altered by the virus, resulting in diaphyseal and/or metaphyseal, periosteal, and circumferential accumulation of woven and lamellar bone. Osteopetrosis is bilaterally symmetrical and involves the long bones, especially the tibiotarsus and tarsometatarsus. Birds 8–12 wk old are most commonly affected. Lymphoid leukosis often occurs in chickens with osteopetrosis. Avian osteopetrosis differs from mammalian osteopetrosis in which a defect in osteoclast function results in abnormal bone resorption and accumulation of primary spongiosa in the marrow cavity.
     

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