Help With ramp into Wagon

Discussion in 'Coop & Run - Design, Construction, & Maintenance' started by ArXane, Feb 1, 2017.

  1. ArXane

    ArXane Out Of The Brooder

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    We converted a hay wagon into a a portable chicken wagon for raising Freedom Rangers. We did two batches last year with about 50 for each batch. Below are pictures of the temporary ramp I had on the front. The ramp is one thing that does not work good. I need help to try and figure out the best way to have a quick attach ramp. I looked at items from boat docks, wheel chair ramps, and quick attach ramps to utility trailers and I just cant find what i'm looking for. The plan is to make a new ramp with hardware at the end that can be easily removed from the wagon, yet needs to be heavy duty enough to be able to hold my weight plus feed to fill the inside feeder storage. Any ideas? Here are the pics of the current setup.

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    Last edited: Feb 1, 2017
  2. Howard E

    Howard E Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Use steps instead? Something that travels with the wagon. Think steps on an RV door.

    I've never understood ramps. I realize they present an idyllic, pastoral image, but birds can easily hop a foot or two a whole lot easier than they can waddle up or down a ramp. They somehow manage to hop up to nests, and up to roosts but can't make it in and out of a door without a ramp?
     
    Last edited: Feb 1, 2017
  3. Howard E

    Howard E Chillin' With My Peeps

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    BTW, I personally think building a low profile coop on the bed of an old hay wagon is a good idea for a portable coop. You may have to chock the wheels to keep in from rolling around in a howling wind, but it would be easy to move around. Birds can hang out under it in the shade. Hang a curtain of electric poultry netting around the perimeter to keep them safe? It travels too.
     
  4. ArXane

    ArXane Out Of The Brooder

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    Steps would be very nice for us, but I think when they are chicks they would have a hard time with all the hopping, the height of the deck is a little over 3ft.


    It has worked great for us, couldn't be happier with the decision. No need to chock our wheels. We use the poultry netting to keep them in and bird netting to keep the dang hawks out.
     
  5. Ridgerunner

    Ridgerunner Chicken Obsessed

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    Great idea to make a portable coop. That looks like electric netting which is a standard way to control predators. Easily portable and easily managed.

    I can’t get those photos to blow up and my monitor isn’t top notch. Even though I cleaned my glasses I can’t tell a lot of detail, but you seem like a handy person. I’d suggest using some type of hooks on top to keep the ramp from sliding down. The hooks don’t necessarily need to support all your weight if you can support that on something else, just keep it from moving. That could be a key going into a slot, a prong on each side going into a hole, or something curved of bent to hook over a stop. A couple of nails, hooks, or screws on the outside of the tractor so you can hang it and the ramp moves with the tractor.
     
  6. ArXane

    ArXane Out Of The Brooder

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    Thanks, it really has worked well for us. A hook and loop is not a bad idea really..... I could make a support for the ramp to just sit on and then hook/look to keep it from kicking sideways... hmmmm... Thanks for the suggestion.

    Also, I made images small as I had so many of them. I have a bunch of higher res images I could post if requested.
     
  7. Ridgerunner

    Ridgerunner Chicken Obsessed

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    No better photos requested. You are looking at it, you know your building skills, you know what materials you have on hand. You have to live with it.

    Another thought. Have something sturdy for it to rest on so you don’t have to worry about strength, but drill a hole through the runners on your ramp and on into what it is resting one. Put large nails through those holes to hold it into place. I don’t know that you have a horizontal for the ramp to rest on, but I’ll show a photo of how I attached my roosts so they are removable. There are so many different ways you can do this.

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  8. ArXane

    ArXane Out Of The Brooder

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    Not a bad idea, I will have to figure out bracing to still "sit" the ramp on.

    I really like the idea of doing something like this:
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  9. aart

    aart Chicken Juggler! Premium Member

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    Might think about hinging it so you can fold it up and latch it to the coop when moving instead of removing it......
    .......an old solid wood door might do the trick with a bit of modification.

    Is that overhead netting I see....how do you deal with that when moving...how often do you move???
     
  10. ArXane

    ArXane Out Of The Brooder

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    We would prefer to remove it rather then folding up...

    Funny you bring up a solid door, was just looking at these door hinges:
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    We might use 3 or so on the ramp and they could be pretty easy to remove? Just more options.



    As far as the netting goes... We just "roll" it up to the wagon when we are ready to move. Its not ideal but it works. I wish I could think of something better for quick bird netting. The only real issue is in the fall when the leaves get on it. However the chickens love the netting because it traps bugs like dragonflys under and they chase them. For the first month or so when the chicks are old enough to be out we move the wagon every two weeks. During the last month or so we move once a week. It probably takes us 25 minutes to move the wagon, fencing and netting.

    Here is a better high res pick to show the netting better.

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