Help with sick sebright!! Only 2wks old

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by thehainline5, Aug 5, 2013.

  1. thehainline5

    thehainline5 Out Of The Brooder

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    I got a 2nd sebright today. A sister for my current silver sebright. From the same hatch. Got her home. She went immediately to the food gulped some down and and then started kind of retching, stretching and repeatedly swallowing. I checked her crop and throat and all the food was stuck in her throat. Apon opening her beak you could see the food. I got some of the food out. Massaged and gave her some water with a syringe. Got the food cleared and now she is acting vey lethargic. I gave her some plain pedialyte. She ate a little. I ground her food up with a coffee bean grinder to make it a powder so she wouldn't get any stuck again. I dunno what I need help with for sure but I'm so worried about her! Is there anything else I can do?? Oh the lady I got her from only feeds them twice a day. And there are about 15 sebright a in the same cage. Compared to my sebright I got from her a week ago this one is tiny!! And very bony :(
     
    Last edited: Aug 5, 2013
  2. thehainline5

    thehainline5 Out Of The Brooder

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    She passed away :(
     
  3. chooks4life

    chooks4life Overrun With Chickens

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    Sorry to hear that.

    Sounds like a severe blockage. Sorry nobody answered sooner, not that it would have helped anyway. From the sounds of it she was far gone already. I would discuss this with the woman who sold her to you because she would have noticed something was wrong in all likelihood. At least, assuming she caught the hen to give her to you, she would have noticed how bony she was. That's a long term problem's results. She ought to refund you if you paid for her. Sorry, again, best wishes.
     
  4. thehainline5

    thehainline5 Out Of The Brooder

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    [​IMG] i just cant believe she died that quickly. Heres a pic of them last night the one i have had is on the left. The one that died is on the right. She didnt pick them up. Not good at sexing them so I always pick them up. I did pay for her. $5 the worst is the fact that finally decided to get mine a friend. She seems so lonely. Then she goes and dies :/
     
  5. chooks4life

    chooks4life Overrun With Chickens

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    Wonder what caused it. Sorry that I don't have any useful info to offer.
     
  6. thehainline5

    thehainline5 Out Of The Brooder

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    Wish I knew too. She didn't offer to replace her either
     
  7. chooks4life

    chooks4life Overrun With Chickens

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    That's a bit stiff! The animal dies on the first day after being bought and it clearly died from a long standing issue, and then the person refuses to replace it....

    I wouldn't buy from nor recommend them to anyone ever again. It's unwise of them to do such a thing. Word gets around, even if no-one's spreading malicious gossip --- people will hear about it. I've talked people's ears off about the faults of my birds, and never sold any I knew were less than 100% unless the person was fully aware, i.e. I once sold a hen who carried leucosis but was a great foster mother. It's common decency to be transparent and accountable. Otherwise it's bad relations, bad money, bad everything, lol... No faith/trust. No good.

    I bought a few lots of chooks in my starting days as a flock-keeper which, if I'd known then what I know now, I would not have bothered with. In future, if you keep chooks in future as well, you will be able to spot a dud before you buy it, and save yourself a lot of trouble. If I had seen an ailing baby walking about before I bought it, now, I would spot the 'dud' --- before I would have had only the vaguest idea. There are signs, though subtle. But consistent and never wrong. Sometimes it's as subtle as noticing it stops and rests a few seconds too long compared to others. Anyway, best wishes, I hope you don't have a bad run of terrible experiences. A few are inevitable though, it seems.
     
  8. thehainline5

    thehainline5 Out Of The Brooder

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    I don't plan on going back to her. I think it's very bad business and just wrong to sell me a sick chick and not own up to it. If I had thought about it and really paid attention I wouldn't have picked her. She was the smallest in the pen ;( poor girl I wish I could have saved her! I can't help but think if it hadn't been a 45 min drive home with her.. If the food had been finer she wouldn't have choked and would have had a chance of surviving. And my poor silver sebright still doesn't have a friend ;(
     
  9. mithious

    mithious Chillin' With My Peeps

    I wish more people would act as responsibly as you do!!!! Thanks for you post!!!
     
  10. chooks4life

    chooks4life Overrun With Chickens

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    Quote: She was run down before you got her; it wasn't the drive, it wasn't the fine food either; something was seriously wrong and had been for a good while to put her in that state. Not your fault.
    Quote: The key to social responsibility is education. The people who sold me some of the worst birds were well intentioned but didn't know what they were passing on; it took me the long hard way to find out, and I had to severely cull back the random lines I'd gotten. At least now I can see a good few common problems and avoid them but others need to learn more too. But how can they without it being freely available info?

    About me being responsible, thanks, but that's all a subjective matter of opinion... I'm sure by many folk's standards, (possibly including yours), I'm irresponsible in some serious ways. For example, I am among the minority who thinks at least some flocks must be well exposed to various diseases and allowed to breed up immune lines rather than be culled outright. I don't advocate spreading these birds but I also don't believe it's all going to turn out well if we keep culling for disease rather than allowing the fittest to survive. There is no incurable disease, only diseases for which we have not yet found the cure. Making the host extinct is not the solution.

    As an extreme example, scientists have retrieved diseases that are thousands of years old from buried and extinct civilizations that died of epidemics of these diseases; but we can't cull humans for being infected; in order to survive into the future, we must learn new ways to cope. Much of our survival and our animal's too depends on us learning how to immunize, not relying on isolation and eradication. You can rarely guarantee it's 100% gone, and if it's not one thing it's another. Highly unpopular stance but not incorrect if employed with careful consideration, I believe. But, each to their own. I don't condemn those who choose to cull their entire flock either.
     

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