Help with using redwood fence for horizontal siding.

Discussion in 'Coop & Run - Design, Construction, & Maintenance' started by horseshowmomnv, Apr 18, 2012.

  1. horseshowmomnv

    horseshowmomnv Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Our coop is 8x10 and I picked a bunch of redwood fence boards really cheap. Now I am questioning my plan. I planned on putting the boards on horizontally and using staggered seams. Should we put OSB board on the outside first? Some of the boards are pretty worn. A friend of mine made it sound like my idea will not work... Any carpenters out there want to offer advice?
     
  2. RonC

    RonC Chillin' With My Peeps

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    OSB will not hold up well if it gets wet. Might be better on the inside.
     
  3. horseshowmomnv

    horseshowmomnv Chillin' With My Peeps

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    RonC, That was my initial plan, but others have made me second guess my idea. So, I thought I would ask those who have gone before me. The boards are not perfect but with OSB being on the inside that will stop the drafts. Is my thought correct... or is there a better idea?

    Maybe I should clarify... the OSB would be underneath the "planks".
     
    Last edited: Apr 18, 2012
  4. RonC

    RonC Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Sounds like you're planning it right to me. Don't know what the others are thinking though. Might put a layer of tarpaper or vapor barrier between the OSB and the planks to keep it dry. What is their "complaint" with your idea?
     
  5. The "perfect" way would be to use OSB then house wrap then actual siding. Perfect is over rated and overly expensive though. What I would do in your situation is

    1. Go ahead and use OSB (the 7/16 is probably 8.00 a sheet)
    2. Use tyvec wrap over that(just staple it or get some of the short nails with the plastic washers) Tyvec is easy...but you can use tar paper to save a bit of money also. Start at the bottom with a strip and work your way up overlapping an inch or two each time you start a new run.
    3. Run your cedar vertical as tight and straight as the boards will allow.
    4. Caulk the joints
    5. Now take some cedar boards and rip them about 2-3 inches wide and use those vertically to cover your seams left from the main boards. What you are doing is using a board and batten technique. Horizontal is feasible but easier for moisture to get between the boards unless cut on an angle across the width so you can overlap like siding.
     
  6. horseshowmomnv

    horseshowmomnv Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Biaro, Thank you. You answered my questions. Because the boards are only 6 and my walls are seven we need to go horizontal. Felt paper isn't too expensive, have not priced Tyvec.
    This makes sense.
     
    Last edited: Apr 18, 2012
  7. PS... Where you live I would consider insulating the inside of at least the North wall then covering that wall inside with OSB as well.
     
  8. Tyvec is more expensive. Since you need to go horizontal and if you use felt paper...I would go with the heavier stuff and def. overlap a couple inches. Be certain you start at the bottom and overlap that with the one above so if water gets in it will run down the paper without getting behind it.
     
    Last edited: Apr 18, 2012
  9. horseshowmomnv

    horseshowmomnv Chillin' With My Peeps

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    We are in Reno, so we don't get many straight days with below freezing temps all day. Honestly I am really tired of spending money building this project, costing alot more than we thought, doesn't it always?
     
  10. horseshowmomnv

    horseshowmomnv Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Thank you !
     
    Last edited: Apr 18, 2012

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