Help! Young hen with infected wound

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by Chikn_Nugets, Mar 27, 2018.

  1. Chikn_Nugets

    Chikn_Nugets Hatching

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    Mar 27, 2018
    I got a young broiler hen from my friend the other day because she was sick and needed help. We cannot afford to take him to the vet, so I am trying to heal her at home. She was introduced to the older hens, but they mauled her and plucked out all her rear-end feathers. Now, shes got some sort of an infection going on. She is excreting white liquid that hardens on her feathers. At first I thought it might be diarrhea, but she is pooping normally, although there is some blood and she appears to be in pain or has trouble defecating. There does not appear to be any large open wounds, just some small scratches here and there. She is drinking and eatting. I've tried to wash her, and applied blu-kote. But the white excretions remain, and she does not seem to be getting any better. Any thoughts as to what this might be? Or how to help? Her rear end does appear to be bloated, but maybe that's just how broilers are, I've never owned some so I can't compare her to a healthy one.
    Any advice would be much appreciated.
     

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  2. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive Enabler

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    Welcome to BYC. I hope that others chime in with help. It looks like she may have been feather and vent pecked by the other chickens. She possibly could have suffered a vent prolapse, where the internal tissue of the cloaca protrudes outside, and the others may peck at it injuring the tissue because of it’s red color. Even if it was not prolapsed, sometimes chickens will vent peck cannibalizing others if they are overcrowded, bored, or not getting high enough protein in the diet. The white material is probably urates, the kidny waste that is seen as a white cap in chicken droppings. I would recommend giving her a warm soak in Epsom salts water or with a disinfectant such as chlorhexidene or betadine from the first aid aisle. Do this every day, and dry her thoroughly. Apply some plain triple antibiotic ointment to her raw vent area. Separate her with food and water. Make sure that she can pass droppings.
     
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