help!!!!!

Discussion in 'Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying' started by TreyShanks20, Oct 6, 2015.

  1. TreyShanks20

    TreyShanks20 Out Of The Brooder

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    Mar 29, 2015
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    Any ideas on why my chickens havent layed an egg since late july?
     
  2. Chicken Girl1

    Chicken Girl1 Loving the Autumn Weather Premium Member

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    Have they started molting? Are they going under any stress? Has something happened change up their daily lives?
     
  3. azygous

    azygous Chicken Obsessed

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    How many hens were laying. How old? What are they being fed? Do they have access to natural day light?
     
  4. TreyShanks20

    TreyShanks20 Out Of The Brooder

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    Mar 29, 2015
    Columbus, Nebraska
    Yes they have daylight, and there has been feathers everywhere in the coop for about a month
     
  5. Messipaw

    Messipaw Chillin' With My Peeps

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    It seems like they are molting. Have you checked for lice and mites?
     
  6. TreyShanks20

    TreyShanks20 Out Of The Brooder

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    Mar 29, 2015
    Columbus, Nebraska
    No lice or mites
     
  7. TreyShanks20

    TreyShanks20 Out Of The Brooder

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    46
    Mar 29, 2015
    Columbus, Nebraska
    How long does molting last
     
  8. azygous

    azygous Chicken Obsessed

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    If your hens are two years or older, they are most likely molting. Molt can last as little as a month in some chickens who molt hard and fast. Others drag it out over a three month period. Most are in this latter category, and when they complete molt, egg laying will resume in some, but not all. The days are getting shorter with less daylight, and that's a big factor in egg laying so they may not resume laying until days begin to get longer again after January.

    Some folks put a low wattage light in the coop on a timer to come on two hours before sunrise to simulate a longer day. This helps to stimulate egg laying.

    The argument against this is that molt provides a natural rest period for a hen's body to replenish her reserves resulting in increased egg quality.
     

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