HELP!!!

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by Plum, Aug 3, 2008.

  1. Plum

    Plum Out Of The Brooder

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    Feb 4, 2008
    Portland, Oregon
    I went out to open up my coop about an hour ago and my beautiful Plum looked very odd. The other 2 girls were up and moving around but not her. The smell was unbelieveable in there too.
    I picked her up and looked her over and beneath her vent were hundreds of squirmy things that looked like maggots.
    I brought her in and tried washing them off and some did but they don't look like maggots but have legs and were walking around in the sink. The ones that didn't wash off, I plucked off with tweezers.
    Poor plum has an crater where they were and I suspect some may have burrowed inside.
    What are they?
    What do I do next?
    How can I get rid of them?
    Are my other 2 at risk? I have looked the other two over and they are ok. Some of these things were floating in their water.
    Charis
     
    Last edited: Aug 3, 2008
  2. nnbreeder

    nnbreeder Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jun 22, 2008
    Oklahoma
    Do you have any antiseptic spray like Blu-Kote? if you do spray the area very well but it is a waiting game now for your girl. Keep a close watch on her and keep the area clean of eggs or maggots. This is really common in the summertime especially if a broody is sitting a nest.
     
  3. nnbreeder

    nnbreeder Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jun 22, 2008
    Oklahoma
    Also could you please state the general area that you are in? It may help to id the insects, thanks
     
  4. Barnyard

    Barnyard Addicted to Quack

    Aug 5, 2007
    Southwest Georgia
    Is it maggots or mites? When was the last time your girls were wormed and treated for mites?


    Edited to add: What color were the things you picked off?
     
    Last edited: Aug 3, 2008
  5. Alaskan

    Alaskan The Frosted Flake

    Really try to check the 'crater' for any more of them, and keep checking in case any more show up. Flush it VERY well to make sure all dirt and possible eggs as well as any rotten skin / meat comes off.

    Super nasty, but if you manage to get all the rotten flesh out, and keep it clean, it should heal OK.
     
  6. Plum

    Plum Out Of The Brooder

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    Feb 4, 2008
    Portland, Oregon
    I'm in Portland Oregon.
    The things were the size of fly maggots. Pointy heads.
    Plum is a barred rock and 7 years old and she isn't laying any more.
    The wound is nasty looking and the only thing I have on hand is neosporin which I did put on her after I cleaned/plucked them off.
    I also started her on baytril.
    I have separated her from the other two hens and will probably bring her in my kitchen so she won't feel lonely.
    Plum is my education bird and most loved by me.
     
  7. Plum

    Plum Out Of The Brooder

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    22
    Feb 4, 2008
    Portland, Oregon
    The hens were wormed 3 months ago.
    I have not treated them for mites as they have not been an issue here.
     
  8. Barnyard

    Barnyard Addicted to Quack

    Aug 5, 2007
    Southwest Georgia
    I agree with Alaskan. I would check to make sure there were no more on the wound. Keep it cleaned and keep the neosporin on it. I think you did right by moving her inside. I also agree with you putting her on antibotics. You have taken all the steps that I would have done so far! Hopefully with a little TLC she will be better in no time.
     
  9. Plum

    Plum Out Of The Brooder

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    Feb 4, 2008
    Portland, Oregon
    I have just been able to reach my vet. She returned from vacation early this morning.
    I'm going to meet her at her clinic in a little bit and i'll let you know what she says.
    I really appreciate the responces. You have calmed me down.
    I was freaking out.
    Thank you.
    Charis
     
  10. willkatdawson

    willkatdawson Chillin' With My Peeps

    Mar 31, 2008
    Ga
    any update? Hope the vet can help.
     

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